June/July

Before

Winter Care of Roses

Summary of tasks to be completed during the main 2 months of winter.

1)Begin pruning about 20th June. A week earlier for climbers.

2)Remove all dead leaves and old mulch

3)Spray with Lime Sulphur

4)Apply Seamungus or Blood and Bone plus a dressing of lime. Fork in lightly.

5)Remove dead or poor specimens and replace both plant and soil

6)Plant new Bare-Rooted Roses

SEE FULL DETAILS BELOW

 

Winter Care

After

Good winter care of Roses will pay dividends during Spring and Summer.

PRUNING.

Start pruning around the 20th of June but in severe frost prone areas it pays to leave it a week or two later. Frost can damage the new shoots. Climbers can be started a week or two earlier. Do not be afraid to cut unruly bushes back severely by a half to three quarters. See below.

REMOVE DEAD LEAVES AND MULCH

The removal of all mulch, weeds, and dead leaves will help to prevent the carry over of fungal spores which will re-establish Blackspot and other fungal disease in the Spring.

SPRAY WITH LIME SULPHUR

A thorough spray with Lime Sulphur (available at hardware stores and nurseries) helps to get rid of those fungal spores and aphids that overwinter in the bark and crevices on the rose stems. An alternative spray is to use copperoxychloride. Whichever you use spray around the plant as well as the soil around it.

APPLY SEAMUNGUS OR BLOOD & BONE.

Apply Seamungus or Blood and Bone around the Roses and fork lightly into the soil to prevent any major damage to the roots. Seamungus is the best of the two as it contains seaweed as a root stimulant andalso Blood and Bone. There products help to rejuvenate the soil but take up to four months to be broken down by soil bacteria. Hence the need to apply during winter.

REMOVE DEAD AND UNWANTED PLANTS

This is the best time to replace roses. When removing dead ones or those that look very sick, dig ou about a barrow load of soil and replace with fresh earth. The cause of death may still be in the soil and the replacement may also be affected.

PLANT NEW BARE-ROOTED ROSES

For a new bare-rooted rose dig a hole about 30cm wide and deep enough, so that when planted the bud will be just above ground level. Place a little Seamungus (not sudden Impact) in the bottom of the hole and then make a small mound so that the roots are well spread. Fill in with a mixture of soil containing lots of organic matter like mushroom compost. Do not use chicken manure as this may burn the new roots.

 

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