June

Winners of the show bench sections in May as judged by Roger Kennett
Section First Second Third
Flower of the month - - -
One Rose Ralph Slaughter Carol Burns Ralph Slaughter
One stem of other flower (not a Rose) Ralph Slaughter Michelle Harrop Val Dack
Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers) Kerry Elliott Kerry Elliott -
Floral Art (in water) June Dineen M. Willmott M. Willmott
Bulbs, Tubers, Corms, Rhizomes - - -
Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem June Dineen Shirley Hall -
Container of flowers - - -
Cacti, succulent or potted plant Ingrid Tully Ralph Slaughter Maurice Cunningham
Above ground vegetable Ralph Slaughter Carol Burns Ralph Slaughter
Below ground vegetable Carol Burns Carol Burns -
Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed) Ralph Slaughter Henry Cotton -
Fruits, Nuts Carol Burns Carol Burns Ralph Slaughter
BEST EXHIBIT Ingrid Tully

Places to go and things to see:
• Visit Diggers Club gardens at Heronswood (Dromana) and St Erth (Blackwood) during June, July and August and get free admission on presentation of your RACV membership card.

Things to do in the garden in July:

Flower Garden:
Complete Rose pruning by the end of the month and spray with Lime Sulphur. Apply Dolomite lime. Continue dividing perennials, cut back Fuchsias, prune shrubs that require shaping and reducing in size, but natives are best left until after spring flowering. Plant Alyssum, Aquilegias, Delphiniums, Violas, Primulas and Pansies.

Vegetable Garden:
Plant Cauliflower, Broccoli, Cabbage, Silverbeet, Shallots and Onions. Plant seed potatoes at the end of the month.
Prepare garden beds with top up of soil in necessary. Apply plenty of rotted compost, Seamungus or Searles Five-in One. Then apply Dolomite lime turning over the soil a spade depth.

Lawns: Carry out essential weeding. especially the removal of Cape Weed. Mow regularly. Do not leave large quantities of lawn clippings to rot on the lawn.

Home Orchard:
Complete pruning of Plums, Peaches, Nectarines and Apricots before they begin to flower early in August. Spray all Deciduous trees with Lime Sulphur. Purchase copper-based products for the control of Curly Leaf, being ready to spray as bud colour is present. Watch for the presence of Scale and “Sooty Mould” on Citrus trees and spray if necessary with White Oil.


Today’s meeting: A member’s forum on “Why I am a gardener”. We will also be viewing a video of a famous Canadian garden.

Jack Frost
Plants have water filled cells within their leaves and during a frost, ice crystals form and shards of ice slice open the cell walls and ruin the plant tissue.
Even after your plants have died back to the ground, the soil may be warm enough to keep the roots alive. Plants with more established roots can have a better survival rate. Trees, shrubs and perennials that were recently planted could benefit from insulating the soil, keeping it warmer longer by spreading a layer of mulch around those plants.
Covering plants when frost is predicted also helps. On small plants use upturned pots or a bucket, bigger plants can be covered with old sheets, newspaper, or commercially available cloth. Remember to remove the covering next morning to allow the sun to reach the plant.
If plants are burned by frost, do not prune off damaged leaves until the chance of all frosts has passed. The damaged leaves offer some protection to the foliage below during subsequent frosts. Don’t be tempted to remove a frost damaged plant if it looks dead; leave it till the weather warms up – it could sprout new growth.
What’s new? Developed in France and grown by a consortium of 14 of the largest apple growers from across the world are a new range of apples with a difference. The new varieties were launched in Madrid late 2017 and will be introduced to Australia soon by Montague Orchards. Three varieties in the Kissabel range are – Rouge which has a deep red skin and a red and white flesh with a hint of berry flavour, Jaune has a pink centre and Orange has an orange skin with a pink-red flesh. All are described as having amazing flavours.

Sight of the week: A woman seen picking all the autumn leaves off her grafted Japanese Maple, so it wouldn’t leave a ‘mess”.

The Happy Valley Garden club go on a mystery tour every Wednesday and to make it interesting they have a sweep to guess where they are going. Bruce, the coach driver, has won five weeks in a row.

Next meeting: Monday, 23rd July commencing at 9.45am. Doors open 9am for setting up. Entries for show bench to be placed for judging prior to 9.30am.
Morning tea duty (July): Kerry & Carla
Flower of the month (July): Three different Camellias

Please support our Club sponsors:
 Rowes nursery, Landsborough Road, Warragul. rowes@dcsi.net.au They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
 Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
 Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul. Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices. They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
 Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc. Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul. 5623 1960

 

May 2018

Winners of the show bench sections in March as judged by Margaret Monk

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month (One Rose)

Heather Coustley

Ingrid Tully

Heather Coustley

One Rose   [Rose was flower of month]

Heather Coustley

Ralph Slaughter

Val Dack

One stem of other flower (not a Rose)

Robyn Hill

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Aileen White

Val Dack

Aileen White

Floral Art (in water)

Heather Coustley

June Dineen

Heather Coustley

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms, Rhizomes

Aileen White

Marie Woolan

Aileen White

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

Heather Coustley

Robyn HIll

Heather Coustley

Container of flowers

Robyn Hill

Aileen White

Robyn Hill

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Aileen White

Aileen White

-

Above ground vegetable

Judy Butler

Carol Burns

Judy Butler

Below ground vegetable

Judy Butler

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Carol Burns

Fruits, Nuts

Carol Burns

Judy Butler

= Judy Butler

= Judy Butler

BEST EXHIBIT

Robyn Hill

 

 

 

Today’s guest speaker:  Paul Kirkpatrick “The weird and wonderful world of plant collectors”.

Today’s morning tea hosts:  Dawn and June.

 

Places to go and things to do:

  • RHSV Gardener’s Day out.  Sat. 16th June commencing 9.30am.  Prior registration and payment of $15 required by 1st June.  Guests include Jane Edmanson, Stephen Ryan and Attila Kapitany.  Stalls, presentations, traders.  Light lunch available for $15 must be pre-ordered. Venue: Deakin University campus, Burwood.  Contact Secretary 03 5367 6363 or download registration form from website.
  • North East Melbourne Orchid Society – Winter Orchid Show.  Sat 23rd June 9am-4pm and Sun 24th June 10am-4pm. Orchids on show and for sale. Refreshments. $4 entry.  Bulleen Heights School, Lower Templestowe.

 

Things to do in the garden in June:

June is the official start of Winter and frosts can be expected. When they occur protect frost sensitive plants by putting a few sheets of newspaper over them. Better still, purchase a roll of frost protectant fabric and cover with that. It is claimed that the material increases the temperature on the plant by as much as 3 degrees. This is the best time to empty compost bins and dig the rotted compost into the garden.

Flower garden.

Begin Rose pruning around the middle of the month but if possible, delay for a few weeks as severe frosts can be experienced in July and August. Pruning promotes new growth, and this can be burned by frosts.  Do not put rose prunings in your compost.  Remove all dead leaves and spray with Lime Sulphur or Copper oxychloride on the bushes and all around them. Install and repair any watering systems as this is the best time to get easy access.

Plant seedlings or potted colour of Calendula, Cornflower, Stocks, Snapdragons, Pansies and Violas. Select and plant replacement shrubs.

Vegetable Garden.

Plant Cauliflower, Broccoli, Kale and Cabbage. The White Butterfly season should be over by now but keep an eye out for snails and slugs. Plant peas, Broad Beans, Lettuce, Shallots and Spring Onions. Divide and plant Rhubarb Crowns.

Home Orchard. Select and plant new bare-root trees including Plums, Apricots, Apples, Nectarines, Peaches and Pears, all of which do well in this area. Commence pruning all the above. Clear away all dead leaves and the remains of fruit and spray with Lime Sulphur.

Lawns. The autumn rain will have encouraged weeds to grow. Spray with a recommended weedicide. De-thatch thick lawns followed by mowing, aerating, and applying a good fertiliser.

My grandpa started walking five kms a day when he was 70 years old and we haven’t any idea where he is now.

 

Did you know:  The largest cacti garden in Australia is ‘Cactus Country’, a 10-acre garden located at Strathmerton, three hours north of Melbourne.  Open to the public, they have over 3000 species of cacti, some of which are over 35 years old.

Broccoli(a member of the cabbage [Brassica] family) is an edible green plant whose large flowering head is eaten as a vegetable either raw or cooked. The word broccoli comes from the Italian, broccolo, which means "the flowering crest of a cabbage”.

There are three commonly grown types of broccoli. The most familiar is Calabrese Broccoli, the one most commonly seen. It is named after Calabria, an area in Italy. It has large (10 to 20 cm) green heads and thick stalks. It is a cool season annual crop. Sprouting Broccoli has many small heads on thin stems. Purple Broccoliis a type of broccoli grown with a head shaped like a cauliflower, which consist of tiny flower buds.

Broccoli is a cool-weather crop which grows best when exposed to an average daily temperature between 7 and 23 °C.   When the cluster of flowers, also referred to as a "head" of broccoli, appear in the centre of the plant, it is ready for harvesting (before the flowers on the head start to bloom). Pests to watch out for are sucking insects (such as aphids), caterpillars and whiteflies.

Boiling broccoli reduces the levels of sulforaphane and other nutrients. A healthier way to cook broccoli is by steaming, microwaving or stir-frying.  Stems can be sliced thinly and used in cooking,

 

Just for a laugh:  My wife said “Wacha doin’ today?”  I said, “nothing”.  She said, “You did that yesterday”.  I said, “I wasn’t finished”.

 

Next meeting:  Monday, 25th June commencing at 9.45am.  Doors open 9am for setting up.  Entries for show bench to be placed for judging prior to 9.30am. 

Morning tea duty (June):  Carol & Shirley

Flower of the month (June): One stem of Australian native flower

 

Please support our Club sponsors:

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.  rowes@dcsi.net.au  They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

 

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul.  5623 1960

 

April

Winners of the show bench sections in March as judged by Lorraine Murfett

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month (One Rose)

Aileen White

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

One Rose   [Rose was flower of month]

 

 

 

One stem of other flower (not a Rose)

Aileen White

Aileen White

Aileen White

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Alan Saunders

(Un-named)

Aileen White

Floral Art (in water)

Aileen White

Ralph Slaughter

 

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms Rhizomes

Heather Coustley

Ralph Slaughter

Aileen White

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

Aileen White

Robyn Hill

 

Container of flowers

Aileen White

Robyn Hill

Heather Coustley

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Alan Saunders

Aileen White

= Ralph Slaughter

= Jan Swan

Above ground vegetable

Ralph Slaughter

Carol Burns

= Carrie Briggs

= Ron Blair

Below ground vegetable

Carol Burns

 

 

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

Ralph Slaughter

Aileen White

Aileen White

Fruits, Nuts

Carol Burns

Lorraine Barrett

= Lorraine Barrett

=Carol Burns

BEST EXHIBIT

Alan Saunders

 

 

 

Office bearers as elected at the AGM last month:

 

President: Ralph Slaughter

Secretary: Judy Butler

Treasurer: Rob Coustley

Vice President: Henry Cotton

Assistant Secretary: Carol Burns

Assist. Treasurer: Gaylene Slaughter

Technical Support:  Howard Sharman

Newsletter:  Irene Rolfe

Door Stewards:  Carrie Briggs & Susan Johnson

Show Bench Stewards: Marj Blair & Janice Swan

Trading Table:  Carrie Briggs & Janice Swan

Library:  Val Dack

Web Master:  Ralph Slaughter

 

 

Subscriptions:  At the AGM held last month it was decided to increase the annual subscription to $15 per person.  These subscriptions are now due and payable.  Monthly meeting entry remains at $2 per person.

Today’s guest speaker:  Peter Ware “Beautiful Baw Baw”.  A slide presentation describing the interaction between flora, fauna, and population of this area.

Today’s morning tea:  Garry & Judy

 

Places to go and things to see:

  • Chrysanthemum Society of Victoria Annual Exhibition.  Sat. 5th May 1pm – 4pm & Sun. 6th May 12 noon – 4pm.  Plants for sale.  Burwood Heights Uniting Church Hall, Burwood. Ph. 03 9898 5458.
  • RHSV Gardener’s Day out.  Sat. 16th June commencing 9.30am.  Prior registration and payment of $15 required by 1st June.  Guests include Jane Edmanson, Stephen Ryan and Attila Kapitany.  Stalls, presentations, traders.  Light lunch available for $15 must be pre-ordered. Venue: Deakin University campus, Burwood.  Contact Secretary 03 5367 6363 or download registration form from website.

 

So true:  Wood burns faster when you have to cut and chop it yourself.

Things to do in the Garden in May:

Flower garden. Plant seeds of Forget-Me-Not, Calendula, Delphinium, Alyssum and Lobelia. Plant seedlings of Polyanthus, Hollyhocks, Lupins, Stocks, Iceland Poppy, Primulas, Pansy and Viola. Violas will flower right through until the end of November, especially if grown in pots. Plant Pansies in a slightly shaded position for the Spring as they are not as heat resistant as Violas. Spring bulbs such as Tulips and Daffodils should be planted before mid-May. Select and plant new Camellias. Start to divide Perennials.

Vegetable Garden. Continue to plant Cauliflower, Cabbage and Broccoli for a succession. Dig plenty of organic compost and manure into the soil and then apply a good dressing of lime as most soils in the area are slightly acid and brassicas like a neutral Ph. Apply liquid fertiliser such as Harvest or Nitrosol at 4-6 weekly intervals. Plant Onions, Shallots, Peas, Parsnips, Chinese Cabbage and Celery. Plant green crop seeds for digging in later in beds not in use through the winter.

Home Orchard. Remove all weeds from the base of the trees. Plant new or replacement trees. Lemons, Oranges, Grapefruit and Mandarins all do well in this local area. Bare root stone fruit, apples and pears will all become available by the end of the month. Nashi pears do really well. Get the supplier to show how to prune bare-root trees before planting.

Lawns. Sowing of new lawns can take place throughout winter but the colder the temperature, the slower will be germination and establishment. The use of a Lawn Starter fertiliser when sowing the seed will pay dividends. Repair patches in old lawns. If after rain lots of weed seedlings occur use a recommended lawn weeder spray. Keep blades on mowers high.

 

Bus trip to Geelong:  Forty-two members headed off on a day that started foggy, towards Geelong and Winchelsea.  Our first destination was at the Geelong Botanic Gardens.  The road getting close to the entrance wasn’t very bus friendly, but our very skilled driver, Sue, handled the problem beautifully. The gardens, established in 1851 cover an area of 17 acres (7ha) and feature fountains, Queensland Bottle trees, a fernery, collections of Roses, Pelargoniums and Salvias as well as heritage listed trees and many other plants.  Some members enjoyed coffee and cake at the café, while others utilised the morning tea supplied by the bus company.

Next stop was in Winchelsea for lunch in cafes, the bakery or just out in the sun while watching the traffic go by.  Jenny & Arthur welcomed us to their property, Country Dahlias.  Arthur made a grand entrance, riding in his two-seater ‘weeding machine’ made from a ride on mower.  Whilst at the end of their season, the paddocks and garden beds were a blaze of colour with many varieties and types of Dahlias – 2350 different plants.  With more than 20,000 plants, a lot of work awaits them with labelling and lifting clumps of tubers. Due to lack of rain and feed, rabbits have devastated some areas of their garden.  Our trip home was a long, slow one with Melbourne traffic to deal with; arrival back in Warragul was around 7pm after drop-offs in Pakenham and Drouin.  Everyone enjoyed their day; thanks to Howard who planned it all.

 

Handy hint:  Don’t throw away used disposable plastic knives and forks; these make good labels for plants when pushed into the soil.  The slats from venetian blinds can also be cut up to create long lasting labels. Chinagraph pencils are excellent for writing on the labels as they don’t fade or wash off.

 

Next meeting:  Monday, 28th May commencing at 9.45am.  Doors open 9am for setting up.  Entries for show bench to be placed for judging prior to 9.30am. 

Morning tea duty (May): Dawn & June. 

Flower of the month (May): Container of Autumn flowers.

 

Please support our Club sponsors:

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.  rowes@dcsi.net.au  They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

 

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul.  5623 1960