July 2021

Winners of the show bench sections in June as judged by Dawn Gough

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month

Aileen White

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

One Rose  

No entries

 

 

One stem of other flower (not a Rose)

Ralph Slaughter

Kerry Elliott

Joy Vikas

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Hillary Height

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

Floral Art (in water)

June Dineen

Hillary Height

Annette Willmott

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms, Rhizomes

Carol Burns

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

-

 

 

Container of flowers

Annette Willmott

Carol Burns

-

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Ralph Slaughter

= Ralph Slaughter

= Carol Burns

Annette Willmott

Above ground vegetable

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

Below ground vegetable

Carol Burns

Carol Burns

Ron Blair

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

-

 

 

Fruits, Nuts

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

Carol Burns

Novice

Joy Vikas

 

BEST EXHIBIT

June Dineen

 

FROM THE PRESIDENT’S CHAIR (Meeting cancelled due to lockdown)

 

Dear Fellow Gardeners,

Here I sit at my desk after a lovely morning’s exercise walk, which is one thing we can do during another lockdown, and hoping this newsletter finds you well and happy! While out walking it was lovely to see so many daffodils starting to pop their beautiful yellow heads up and give us a sense that  the end of winter is near.

 

Thank you to all who bought daffodil bulbs in support of the West Gippsland Hospital Fund raiser and a total of $175.00 has been forwarded on and Karyn O’Brien, Public Relations Manager, was delighted to hear that the last of their bulbs had been sold.

 

Ralph’s ‘Jobs to do in the garden in August’ is also a reminder that Spring is nearly upon us, and it is time to get ourselves organised for planting seeds and fertilizing. Yesterday I happily spent an hour cleaning my garden shed and then disinfecting my punnets and preparing my little hot house, courtesy of an idea I got from a Gardening Australia magazine last year, for my summer veggie garden. While I was sweeping and cleaning I was so happy, even though it was very cold outside, but I was enjoying the peace and the fresh air and I was singing to myself. Do you sing while in the garden?

At our last meeting we all enjoyed a song sung and composed by club member Val Dack.

“ A garden for me, a garden for you,

   It’s a lifetime of Joy,

  With so much to do,

  At the Garden Club meeting,

  We can show bench or treasure,

  And meet and greet members for a morning of pleasure.”

How wonderful it was and thank you so much Val for bringing a smile to our faces.

I love to sing a song or two and yesterday for some reason “Que Sera Sera”, an oldie but a goodie, by Doris Day came to my mind. “Que Sera Sera, whatever will be will be, the futures not ours to see, que sera sera, what will be will be.” How appropriate is that and isn’t that what we all need to remember now. Our meetings are uncertain, our garden trips are uncertain but …what will be, will be!

 

**Unfortunately, our meeting for Monday 26th is unable to be held due to this current lockdown.

Paul Kirkpatrick was to speak on “Wendy Whiteley’s garden” (Wife of the late Brett Whiteley, well known artist). He has kindly agreed to speak at our August meeting and June Dineen, who was to talk in August about best practices for exhibiting, has agreed to defer her presentation for a date to be announced.

At our coming Monday meeting we were asking members to pay for the Bus trip to Garden World and Crystal World, planned for Thursday 12th August.

If you are still interested in participating in this trip could you please email me as soon as possible.

Cost of the trip is $30 payable as you get onto the bus. If we do not get enough participants I will need to postpone this trip.

REMINDER:

Pick up is at Warragul 9:15 and Drouin 9:30.

Please advise me where you will be picked up from in your email.

 

If you need assistance with one of our walkers or wheelchairs, please let me know.

 

BYO lunch or purchase at the Garden World Café.

 

Covid rules will apply both on the bus and at the places we visit.  Don’t forget to bring your mask.

 If intending to make any purchases it would be advisable to bring some bags with you.

 

A reminder that our September meeting will be at the Normanby Street Community Garden (parking behind the Toy Library).  We will have our annual sale of plants which have been lovingly grown by our members and there will be a raffle as well. Lockdown is a perfect time to pot and take cutting for this very important activity as funds raised will go towards helping us to purchase better equipment for presentations at our meetings.

 

Keep well and keep safe. Mask up, practice social distancing and always remember to wash your hands and let’s hope that this is the last lockdown.

Ah! Another song has come to my mind, “High Hopes”. Remember the lyrics, “Next time you’re down with your feet to the ground there’s a lot to be learnt, just look around!

Get out into the garden and enjoy and remember the yellow daffodils are a symbol of happiness and new beginnings.

We will get through this together. Enjoy preparing your garden ready for Spring.

Joy

Fertiliser Collection At this stage we are expecting the fertiliser ordered by members, to be delivered on Friday August 6th at Jan Newgreen’s property, 65 Rulemont Road, Warragul. A confirmatory Email including time for pick-up will be sent nearer the time.

 

Jobs to do in the garden in August

August is when the ‘Gardening Year’ starts all over again. Air temperatures begin to rise but the most important is improved soil temperatures which assist both germination of seeds and new growth of plants. August is also the best time to start applying fertiliser. Mid-August is ideal as the various plants make their new roots underground. When you see new shoots appearing, not only is the plant waking up above ground but it will be doing the same below ground.

Flower Garden: Complete Rose pruning and spray with Lime Sulphur. Apply Dolomite lime. Apply rose fertiliser (Neutrog Sudden Impact or Black Marvel) during third or fourth week. Watch for Aphids to make their first appearance. Complete dividing perennials, cut back Fuchsias and prune hydrangeas back to the best big fat buds, thinning out old wood. Plant Alyssum, Aquilegias, Delphiniums, Violas, Primulas and Pansies as potted colour to get a quick result. The first petunias can be planted under cover or raised in the greenhouse. Weeds will begin to grow quickly so hoe regularly.

Vegetable Garden: Plant Cauliflower, Broccoli, Cabbage and Silverbeet. Plant seed potatoes but watch for late frost. Earth up or cover with newspaper if frost is forecast.
Prepare Garden beds with top-up of soil if necessary. Apply plenty of rotted compost, Seamungus or Searles Five-in One. Then apply Dolomite lime, turning over the soil a spade depth. Peas and Snow Peas can be sown but wait until September when the soil warms, for sowing beans. Plant tomatoes under cover at the end of the month.

Lawns: This is the best month for essential weeding as the broad leaf weeds are now growing fast and will absorb the sprays well. Cape Weed will flower in October so a second spray may be needed to kill the big “Old Man” ones that can cover so much lawn. An application of some lawn seed to repair the patches left behind may be necessary. Mow regularly but not 4 days before or after the application of lawn weed spray. Yates lawn weeder, despite being the cheapest, seems to do a great job when used as directed.

 

Home Orchard: Complete pruning of Apples and Pears. Spray them with Lime Sulphur. Spray Peaches and Nectarines with Liquid Copper or other copper sprays for the control of Curly Leaf, being ready to spray as soon as bud colour is present. Spray until the product can be seen running down the trunk of the tree. Watch for the presence of Scale and “Sooty Mould” on Citrus trees and spray if necessary, with White Oil. Prune to shape after harvesting fruit. Black Peach aphid may appear on Peach, Apricot. Nectarine and especially plum trees, early in Spring so be ready to deal with it also.

Bus trip to Garden World and Crystal World planned for Thursday 12th August, leaving Warragul from the car park near the Burke Street tennis courts at 9.15 and picking up in Drouin.  BYO lunch or purchase at the Garden World Café. Covid rules will apply both on the bus and at the places we visit.  Don’t forget to bring your mask.  If intending to make any purchases it would be advisable to bring some bags with you. Cost of the trip is $30 payable to our treasurer (in a named envelope).

Did you know that putting mushrooms (with gill side up) out in the sunshine for an hour or two before using will mean that the mushrooms will get a boost of Vitamin D, a vitamin that is lacking in a large percentage of us?

Tomatoes – Fruit or vegetable?  In the 1890’s there was confusion about which category they fitted into when a US Supreme Court named them a vegetable for tax reasons.

Sweet corn is a member of the grass family.

Pumpkin seeds contain more protein than an equal quantity of beef mince.

Strawberries contain about 200 seeds, to be outdone by the pomegranate with a massive 1000 seeds.

 

Quote: You know you are a fanatical gardener when you think ‘Multiculturalism’ means planting flowers with vegetables!

 

Guest speaker (August):  Paul Kirkpatrick “Wendy Whitley’s Garden”.

Flower of the month (August): Three spring bulbs

 

Morning tea duty (Aug):   June, Dawn & Judith. We encourage members to bring their own cups.

 

Please support our Club sponsors:  Don’t forget to check their updates on our Club website.

 

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.    They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. (On the Melbourne side of Drouin) Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

 

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul.  5623 1960

June 2021

Winners of the show bench sections in May as judged by Judy Hopkins

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

Judy Butler

One Rose  

Robyn Hill

Ralph Slaughter

= Ralph Slaughter

= Ralph Slaughter

One stem of other flower (not a Rose)

Diane Dalton

Robyn Hill

Diane Dalton

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Floral Art (in water)

Hillary Height

Heather Coustley

Annette Willmott

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms, Rhizomes

Judy Butler

Judy Butler

Ralph Slaughter

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

Heather Coustley

Judy Butler

Heather Coustley

Container of flowers

Diane Dalton

Robyn Hill

Judy Butler

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Heather Coustley

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Above ground vegetable

Irene Rolfe

Marj Blair

Ralph Slaughter

Below ground vegetable

Ralph Slaughter

Judy Butler

-

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

Irene Rolfe

Heather Coustley

Marj Blair

Fruits, Nuts

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

Judy Butler

Novice

-

 

BEST EXHIBIT

Heather Coustley

 

Today’s speaker:  Unfortunately our plans for a speaker did not eventuate so the Committee thought we could have an informal question and answer segment. With our collective gardening knowledge we feel that an answer to most gardening problems can be found amongst our members.

 

A note from our President: 

 

Dear Fellow Gardener,

I have just finished folding up the washing after finally getting it to dry on this cold wintry day, and there it was! The single sock! I ask you the question, “Where do the partners of these socks go?” Another question I ask myself, many times a day, “Where did I leave my mobile phone?” But, perhaps the most trying question now for me is, “What is eating my cabbages, kale and broccoli seedlings?” I thought at first it was slugs or snails but there are no silvery slimy trails. Then I thought it is the dreaded earwigs that have invaded in the past, but no sign of them in the traps that I set. So, the question is “What is eating them?”

 

As you know I do not like to use chemicals on my garden as I try to be organic but sometimes I might just have to resort to it, but, dear friend, if you can help me I will be grateful. Maybe at our Q & A session today, you have a solution for me, i.e., “What is eating my plants?” NOT “Where is the other sock?” I know the answer to that question. It has gone to the land where all lost socks go!

 

My next question is, “How much will Jim let me spend on our trip to Garden World on the 12th of August?” This should be a very pleasant day. Shopping therapy, after another lockdown! Nothing better and just what the doctor ordered. With such a variety of shops to browse and so many wonderful ideas for gardens it should be a genuinely nice day, not to mention sharing time with members and friends. I am saving my money now and our wonderful editor Irene, assures us that you will all be amazed at the beauty at Crystal World which we will visit on our way home.

Enjoy your day, stay warm and happy gardening.  Joy

TRIP TO GARDEN WORLD AND CRYSTAL WORLD 12th August 2021

 

Depart by bus from Burke St Park Warragul: 9:15am

Depart by bus from Drouin Bowling Club: 9:30am

Return time to Drouin approximately 4:00pm and later to Burke St Park.

Cost: $30.00each

PLEASE PLACE YOUR MONEY IN AN ENVELOPE WITH YOUR NAME CLEARLY MARKED  and

INDICATE WHERE YOU WILL BE PICKED UP FROM

PAYMENT TO BE MADE BY JULY 26TH

 

Lunch: Bring your own or purchase your lunch from the café at Garden World.   Due to Covid rules we may have to stagger our times eating in the café (not everybody at once).  You may take your own lunch to eat, but not in the café. In the afternoon we will be visiting Crystal World to view an amazing range of crystals, minerals, gemstones, meteorites and gift items.  Meet Rosie the massive shark (she doesn’t bite) and see Tom’s dinosaur garden.

Both places we visit have undercover areas, so we are not weather dependant. Please feel free to invite non-members and friends. Covid rules may also mean we wear our masks in the bus so don’t forget to bring one!  Also it may pay to take some large plastic bags with your name on to put plant purchases in. 

 

*Make sure you don’t spend all your money at Garden World as there are lots of things to buy at Crystal World too!

 

Things to do in the garden in July:

July is often the coldest and quietest month in the garden but there are important tasks to complete. Get rid of dead and dying shrubs and summer annuals but don’t be in a hurry to prune back the tops of shrubs like Hydrangeas until the danger of frost is past. It is also the best month to plant new bare-root trees & shrubs.

Flower Garden:   Continue pruning, tidying and dividing herbaceous perennials, plant seedlings of Iceland Poppy, Cineraria, Calendula, Pansies and Violas. Plant potted colour of Primulas, Alyssum, Lobelia, Primrose, Snapdragon, Pansies, Violas, Phlox and Armeria. Prune roses, clear away all dead leaves and old mulch as it will harbour fungus spores. Then spray the roses and the surrounding area with Lime Sulphur or copper oxychloride. This is the best time to check irrigation systems, Fork in Seamungus pellets and apply a dressing of lime.

Vegetable Garden:  Plant Spinach, Parsley, Broad Beans, Celery. Plant seedlings of Cabbage, Cauliflower, Broccoli, Onions & Leeks. Purchase seed potatoes and set up in trays in the shed or garage to sprout ready for planting in August. Plant new Rhubarb crowns. Sow seed mixture to dig in as green manure. Start planting seeds of Tomatoes in the greenhouse for an early crop.

Lawns:  Continue weed control. De-thatch and aerate, as necessary. Do not apply fertiliser until mid-August.

Orchard:  Prune deciduous trees. Start with Apricots Plums, Nectarines & Peaches. Apples and Pears can be left until August. Cut out old raspberry canes and tie in place new ones. Pick Limes, Grapefruit, mandarins and navel oranges. Valencia oranges will probably need another month. Cumquats should be ready for making marmalade which is especially nice if limes are added.

Special Winter Job:  Don’t forget to give all the garden tools a clean and sharpen ready for the busy Spring season. Have the lawnmower serviced.

 

Due to unforeseen circumstances the trip to the nursery in July has been cancelled.

 

Have you paid your annual membership fees yet? $15 per person. Check with Treasurer, Rob if you are unsure.  Payments for Club vests are also due - $40 each.  All payments to be in a named envelope with details of the payment please.

 

A few one liners to brighten your day-

I re-labelled all the jars on my wife’s spice rack.  I’m not in trouble yet, but the thyme is cumin.

Due to isolation, I finished three books yesterday…. And believe me, that’s a lot of colouring.

If any of you know how to fix a broken hinge, my door is always open.

Try to remember that the greener grass on the other side of the fence may be a septic tank issue.

Creative Harvest is an Open Food Garden event which celebrates the art and science of growing healthy food and making art in all its intriguing forms. It is the annual fundraising event supporting the work of the Baw Baw Sustainability Network.

Next year it will be held on the weekend of January 22 & 23.  Do you grow your own food and have a garden that you would be willing to share with others? 

Gardens open from 10 am to 4 pm and the BBSN supplies a volunteer to deal with visitor entry so the gardener is free to talk to visitors and show them around. Gardeners find sharing their knowledge with interested and like-minded people a worthwhile and enjoyable experience.

Artists or Food artisans are in each garden showing and selling their art or produce. It doesn’t matter how big or small your garden is. We would love to hear from you if you have a garden to share or would like to find out more about Creative Harvest.

Contact Wendy Savage on 0428 422 461 or wsavage@dcsi.net.au 

More information about the event is on our website at www.bbsn.org.au/creative-harvest-2020

Guest speaker (July):  Paul Kirkpatrick to speak on “Wendy Whiteley’s garden” (Husband of artist Brett Whiteley.

Flower of the month (July): Three different Camellias

Morning tea duty (July):   Carol, Gaylene & Robert.  We encourage members to bring their own cups.

 

Please support our Club sponsors:  Don’t forget to check their updates on our Club website.

 

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.    They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. (On the Melbourne side of Drouin) Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

 

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul.  5623 1960

 

 

 

May 2021

                 May 2021

Winners of the show bench sections in April as judged by Cathy Johns

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month

Aileen White

T Evans

Robyn Hill

One Rose  

Diane Dalton

Ralph Slaughter

Robyn Hill

One stem of other flower (not a Rose)

Ralph Slaughter

Hillary Height

Diane Dalton

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Hillary Height

Ralph Slaughter

Robyn Hill

Floral Art (in water)

Hillary Height

Hillary Height

June Dineen

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms, Rhizomes

Carol Burns

Carol Burns

Ralph Slaughter

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

Ralph Slaughter

Robyn Hill

Ralph Slaughter

Container of flowers

Annette Willmott

Diane Dalton

Diane Dalton

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

Aileen White

Above ground vegetable

Ralph Slaughter

Judy Butler

Ralph Slaughter

Below ground vegetable

Ralph Slaughter

Judy Butler

Ralph Slaughter

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

-

-

-

Fruits, Nuts

Carol Burns

Carol Burns

Carol Burns

Novice

-

 

BEST EXHIBIT

Ralph Slaughter

 

Today’s guest speaker: Jim Fah “Auto pots – Hydroponics the easy way”

 

A message from our President:

 

Dear Fellow Gardeners,

 

Do you ever find that sometimes you put something somewhere, and when you go to retrieve it, you cannot find it? How frustrating this can be!  As I write this, it is not a gardening day and I find myself in the house occupying my time with some of the many other pastimes I enjoy, including short story writing. Before I could do that, I had to do some tidying up in my office and in the process I found a couple of items, that I have been missing for some time, and I am positive that I did not put them there.

 

Among my short stories, which I never publish, but read to my granddaughters is one of their favourites - a story about the “Put Its” and the “Took its” who live in everyone’s home and they put things and take things and hide them from you, and you miss them for quite some time, until the “Put Its” and “Took Its” return them to some very obscure place. Does this sound familiar? 

 

In our Garden club we have on our mailing list just over 100 names and addresses and we are missing a lot of these people at our meetings. I realise that a lot of us have been hiding away over the last twelve months and now everyone is gradually emerging and getting back into a ‘normal’ life.  We hope that our missing members come back to see us soon.

It is wonderful that we are back to running our meetings as normal and we have been thoroughly enjoying our guest speakers, the trip to Cloudehill, the competition exhibits, and having a chat with friends with a very much enjoyed cuppa at the end of our meetings.

Our committee has been concerned as to why some of our members have not returned to our meetings as we do miss them. If you know of someone who cannot return to our meetings but would still like to keep in touch with us, please let us know. Perhaps a newsletter could be emailed or posted to them? Please contact myself or Judy on our mobiles as we would love to hear from you.

Another one of my enjoyable pastimes is cooking and currently I have a rooster bubbling away in the slow cooker, ‘coq au vin’, hopefully it will be delicious as it has taken a lot of preparation.  Well, I had better be off now to check that the rooster is still where I think I left it, and that is, in the pot!

Keep warm and happy gardening!

Joy

Things to do in the garden in June:

 

June is the official start of Winter and frosts can be expected. When they occur protect frost sensitive plants by putting a few sheets of newspaper over them. Better still, purchase a roll of frost protectant fabric and cover with that. It is claimed that the material increases the temperature on the plant by as much as 3 degrees. June/July is the best time to empty compost bins and dig the rotted compost into the garden. Then apply a good dressing of lime (but not for Camellias, Azaleas, Rhododendrons and Daphne)

Flower garden. Begin Rose pruning around the middle of the month but if necessary, in frost prone areas, delay for a few weeks as severe frosts can be experienced in July and August. Pruning promotes new growth, and this can be burned by frosts.  Do not put rose prunings or old mulch in your compost.  After removing all dead leaves and old mulch, gently fork in a dressing of Dolomite Lime. Spray with Lime Sulphur or Copper Oxychloride on the bushes and all around them. Install and repair any watering systems as this is the best time to get easy access.

The soil is usually too cold now for germination of plant seed to take place so plant seedlings or potted colour of Calendula, Cornflower, Stocks, Snapdragons, Pansies and Violas. Select and plant replacement shrubs. Divide Perennials.

Vegetable Garden.  Plant Cauliflower, Broccoli, Kale and Cabbage seedlings. The White Butterfly season should be over by now but keep an eye out for snails and slugs. Plant Peas, Broad Beans, Lettuce, Shallots, Onions and Spring Onions. Divide and plant Rhubarb Crowns.

 

Home Orchard.Select and plant new bare-root trees including Plums, Apricots, Apples, Nectarines, Peaches and Pears, all of which do well in this area. Commence pruning all the above. Clear away all dead leaves and the remains of fruit and spray with Lime Sulphur. Plant new raspberry canes. Tidy Passion fruit and thornless Blackberries tying the new stems to strong supports while removing dead wood.

Lawns. The autumn rain will have encouraged weeds to grow. Spray with a recommendedweedicide, but not within 4 days either side of mowing. De-thatch thick lawns, followed by mowing, aerating, and applying a good fertiliser. Neutrog’s Sudden Impact for Lawns is an excellent choice.

 

Trading table:  If you have excess garden produce you’d like to sell, bring it along to our meeting with a price on it.  10% of the sale price goes to the Club and the rest is yours. Fruit, vegetables, potted plants, cuttings, etc.

 

Have you paid your annual subscription? Check Treasurer, Rob’s list.  $15.00 per person due now. Please put your fee in an envelope with your name and what the payment is for.

 

 

Garden Club trips:  Unfortunately, the trip to Sale has been postponed.  The next trip we have planned is on 1st July as a self-drive (or car-pool) to Murphy’s Nursery in Bunyip. This nursery is owned by our June guest speaker, Vanessa. Entry is free and there is a small cost for morning tea.

 

On August 12th we plan to visit Crystal World and Garden World. Both places have under cover areas so a wet day won’t be a huge problem.

 

Club vests:  Orders have been placed for these.  If you have ordered one, please put the $40 in an envelope with your name and reason for payment on.  This is to help our Treasurer.

 

Q.  Why did the scarecrow win an award?          A.  He was out-standing in his field.

 

Ron’s tip for covering tall plants with a net.  Put a hole in two tennis balls, push a garden stake into the hole, nail the balls onto the end of the stakes and find a friend who will help you with the next step of putting the sticks up underneath the netting and simply both walk forward past the sides of the plant with the sticks raised.  Ron’s patent has not been approved yet.

 

Show bench:  We encourage all members to contribute to our show bench.  Even novices have a special place to exhibit.  Take a walk around your garden on the morning before the meeting; you never know, you may have a prize-winning flower or vegetable growing.  If exhibiting something unusual, could you please put the name of the plant beside the exhibit so we can all know what it is.

 

Going potty:  Our plant sale coming up in September at the Community Garden.  Could members please start thinking about potting up some cuttings or divisions now, to give them a head start?

 

Guest speaker (June):  Vanessa from Murphy’s nursery – growing Australian plants.

Flower of the month (June): One stem of Australian native flower.

Morning tea duty (June):  Kerry, Lynne, Lorraine. We encourage members to bring their own cups.

 

Please support our Club sponsors:  Don’t forget to check their updates on our Club website.

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.    They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. (On the Melbourne side of Drouin) Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

 

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul.  5623 1960