May 2022

Winners of the April show bench as judged by Dawn Gough.

 

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month   (Single Rose)

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

One Rose      (Container)

Aileen White

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

One stem of other flower (not a Rose)

Aileen White

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

Annette Wilmott

Floral Art (in water)

Annette Wilmott

Heather Coustley

Annette Wilmott

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms, Rhizomes

Heather Coustley

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Container of flowers

Heather Coustley

Dawn Gough

-

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

Above ground vegetable

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

Carol Burns

Below ground vegetable

Carol Burns

Carol Burns

Ralph Slaughter

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

Heather Coustley

Carol Burns

-

Fruits, Nuts

Heather Coustley

Robyn Hill

Carol Burns

BEST EXHIBIT

Heather Coustley

 

Novice Section:  Robert Robinson

 

A message from our President:

 

Dear Fellow Gardener,

Change isn’t always easy to accept and of course it can depend on what the change is. We have recently been given a courtesy car because our car was recalled and now, I have to get use to blinker on the right, not the left and wipers on the left, not the right!!

 

Seasonal change can be hard too. We are getting in the wood for the fire, wearing more clothes, getting up when it is still dark but as I sit at my office window and look out towards the Strzelecki Ranges, I am greeted with a beautiful display of autumn leaves a gentle breeze and leaves falling softly on the ground. A magnificent change! Autumn is perhaps one of my favourite times of the year, which isn’t surprising as red, yellow, and orange are my favourite colours. Last week some of our members enjoyed a visit to Tall Timbers and Coromandel. The day was perfect! After a few days of drizzly rain Thursday was a perfect Autumnal day made even more perfect by the beauty of the gardens and good company. If you would like to see our day out visit our web page for some terrific photographs taken by Irene and her husband.

 

Do you visit our webpage? Technology is a wonderful thing, but it has its pluses and minuses as it is constantly changing.  It can be quite tiresome getting used to one type of program or function and then not long after, it is changed. We all had to get use to QR Codes during the pandemic and now we see them everywhere, magazines, shops etc. Have you been to a restaurant where you must QR Code for the menu and order via your phone? We recently went to a restaurant in the city and our food was delivered by a robot. Another change I find difficult is the question of what ever happened to being able to talk to someone at the other end of the phone rather than a computer telling you, “Your call is important to us, unfortunately we are experiencing a large number of calls at the moment. You have been placed in a queue and we will answer your call as soon as possible. If you would like to visit our website for help, we can be contacted at  bbbbb@com.au .” Meanwhile you listen to a horrible piece of music. Grrr!

If you are having trouble visiting our web page or simply are bamboozled by the changes that occur with technology, then I hope you will enjoy our next meeting where I will give you a few tips on how to use modern technology as a means to help with your gardening. I hope you will find it amusing and informative as I present to you a few simple hints on how to use your computer and phone to solve problems and assist you in the garden.

Hope to see you at the meeting on Monday 23rd May, meanwhile,

Happy Gardening, Joy

 

Tall Timbers & Coromandel trip:  The weather bureau got the forecast wrong which was a bonus for us.  We had bursts of sunshine on the brilliant, coloured foliage on the Autumn trees at Tall Timbers at Piedmont. This had cameras (mostly phones these days) clicking.  Reflections of the lipstick maples on the water made it even better.  A warm welcome by the owners and delicious morning tea was enjoyed.  After a stroll around the large garden, we travelled back to Neerim South for a very social lunch at the Kings Arms Hotel.  Then it was back to Warragul and the Coromandel Arboretum.  There were a few spots of rain along the way but the weather fined up for our walk and talk tour of the Coromandel.  Jan, the owner who has recently sold the property (daughter of the late couple who created the garden), guided us around.  She pointed out the different trees and explained their uses being medicinal, food or other.  The Raisin Tree (Hovenia Dulcis) with its raisin flavoured stems had us all nibbling away.   Yet another tree produced a cure for a common ailment that Val suffered, and she went on to explain to the group all about her ailment.  Everyone was in stitches of laughter.  Val has a wonderful way of explaining things.  Once again, we managed some sunshine and some of us headed home with a couple of limes that Jan invited us to pick in the citrus grove.

 

Things to do in the garden in June:

 

June is the official start of Winter and frosts can be expected. When they occur protect frost sensitive plants by putting a few sheets of newspaper over them. Better still, purchase a roll of frost protectant fabric and cover with that. It is claimed that the material increases the temperature on the plant by as much as 3 degrees. June/July is the best time to empty compost bins and dig the rotted compost into the garden. Then apply a good dressing of lime (but not for Camellias, Azaleas, Rhododendrons and Daphne)

Flower garden. Begin Rose pruning around the middle of the month but if necessary, in frost prone areas, delay for a few weeks as severe frosts can be experienced in July and August. Pruning promotes new growth, and this can be burned by frosts.  Do not put rose prunings or old mulch from under roses in your compost as they will carry fungal disease spores into the new year. It is better to burn them or place in a bag in the general rubbish bin.  After removing all dead leaves and old mulch, gently fork in a dressing of Dolomite Lime. Spray with Lime Sulphur or Copper Oxychloride on the bushes and all around them. Install and repair any watering systems as this is the best time to get easy access.

The soil is usually too cold now for germination of plant seed to take place so plant seedlings or potted colour of Calendula, Cornflower, Stocks, Snapdragons, Pansies, Primulas and Violas. Select and plant replacement shrubs. Divide Perennials. Lift and store Dahlia tubers away from frost.

Vegetable Garden.  Plant Cauliflower, Broccoli, Kale and Cabbage seedlings. The White Butterfly season should be over by now but keep an eye out for snails and slugs. Plant Peas, Broad Beans, Lettuce, Shallots, Onions, Garlic and Spring Onions. Divide and plant Rhubarb Crowns.

 

Home Orchard. Select and plant new bare-root trees including Plums, Apricots, Apples, Nectarines, Peaches and Pears, all of which do well in this area. Commence pruning all the above. Clear away all dead leaves and the remains of fruit and spray with Lime Sulphur. Plant new raspberry canes. Tidy Passion fruit and thornless Blackberries tying the new stems to strong supports while removing dead wood.

Lawns. The autumn rain will have encouraged weeds to grow. Spray with a recommended weedicide, but not within 4 days either side of mowing. De-thatch thick lawns, followed by mowing, aerating, and applying a good fertiliser. Neutrog’s Sudden Impact for Lawns is an excellent choice.

 

An event for your calendar:

Cranbourne Friends of the Royal Botanic Gardens are holding their Autumn plant sale on Saturday 23rd July & Sunday 24th July.  10am -4pm on both days.  Free entry.

The plant sale will be held near the Kiosk at the northern end of the Australian Garden. Parking and entry is available nearby (look for the large red banners). EFTPOS is available.

A large variety of Australian native plants will be available. A plant list will be available on their website approximately a week before the sale.  Website: rbgfriendscranbourne.org.au

 

‘There are no gardening mistakes, only experiments’

 

Fertilizer:  Many of us have very healthy, happy plants thanks to our special fertilizers.  It would be appreciated if you could fill in the fertilizer report forms and hand to Ralph.

 

Membership fees are now due.  $15.00 per person in a named envelope for Treasurer, Rob please. 

 

A few one liners to make you smile:

It’s not my age that bothers me; it’s the side effects. 
As I watch this generation try and rewrite our history, I'm sure of one thing:  It will be misspelled and have no punctuation.

As I’ve gotten older, people think I’ve become lazy.  The truth is I’m just being more energy efficient.

I haven't gotten anything done today. I've been in the Produce Department trying to open this stupid plastic bag. 

 

Volunteer please:  Our newsletter editor will be away for a few months and we need a sub-editor to fill in.  Someone with a computer and email address – the job is not difficult.  Please let Joy know if you can help.

 

Next meeting:  Monday June 27th at 9.30am.  Doors open 9am for setting up.  Entries for show bench to be placed for judging prior to 9.30am.

Morning tea duty (June):  Carol & Val

Flower of the month (June): One stem of Australian native flower

Guest speaker:  How to propagate Australian native plants

 

Please support our Club sponsors:  Don’t forget to check their updates on our Club website.

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.    They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. (On the Melbourne side of Drouin) Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465
  • Drouin Nursery. Convenient for Drouin members - new owner, Andre Linossier looks forward to meeting you.  Phone 0417 041507
  • Down to Earth Garden Centre, Cnr. Longwarry & Weerong Rd, Drouin. Landscaping supplies, mulch, soil, rock, pond supplies, garden hardware. Phone 5625 5166

 

April 2022

Winners of the March show bench as judged by Judith Hopkins.

 

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month   (Single Rose)

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

= Heather Coustley

= Dennis Hall

One Rose      (Container)

 

 

 

One stem of other flower (not a Rose)

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Annette Willmott

Floral Art (in water)

Heather Coustley

Annette Willmott

Annette Willmott

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms, Rhizomes

Janice Swan

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Annette Willmott

Container of flowers

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Janice Swan

Above ground vegetable

Carol Burns

Carol Burns

Ralph Slaughter

Below ground vegetable

Carol Burns

Ralph Slaughter

Carol Burns

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Ralph Slaughter

Fruits, Nuts

Ralph Slaughter

Robert Robinson

= Ralph Slaughter

= Judy Butler

BEST EXHIBIT

Ralph Slaughter

 

 

Results of AGM Committee election held at the March meeting:

President:  Joy Vikas, Treasurer: Rob Coustley, Secretary: Judy Butler, Door Stewards: Ruth Waring & Hilary Height, Newsletter: Irene Rolfe, Vice President: Henry Cotton, Flower Stewards: Aileen White, & Robyn Hill, Morning Tea Roster: Kerry Elliott.

 

Retiring flower stewards, Marj Blair & Janice Swan were presented with hanging baskets in appreciation of their many years in that position at our March meeting.  Well done to Marj and Jan.

 

Reminder: The March AGM marks the commencement of a new Club year as far as memberships are concerned.  As there was no motion on an amendment to the fees at the March 2022 AGM, fees will remain the same as last year. Fees of $15 per member are now due. Please include correct cash in a named envelope, to be given to our Treasurer, Rob.

 

Dear Fellow Gardener,

I hope you and your family have had an enjoyable Easter. Here I sit and the house is silent, visitors gone and grandchildren playing quietly in their respective rooms. “Ah the tranquillity!” (For 30 minutes I hope!).

We have had a wonderful week with my brother-in-law and his wife, and the weather was amazing unlike the last year when they visited, and it was freezing cold. They live in Sydney and so for them it was a great opportunity to get away from the dreadful rain they have been experiencing.

 

Jim and I were looking for places to take them and to share with them the beauty of our area. Our family love the outdoors and enjoy simple outings such as walking in parklands and the bush but sadly my sister-in-law suffers from dreadful motion sickness and so travel is restricted to places within a short distance of Warragul with no windy roads.

 

When they read the article in the Gazette re the Coromandel Arboretum, they would have loved to have been able to visit it, especially as my sister-in-law is Japanese and the arboretum has the peace poles from Japan and the very interesting labyrinth. Let’s hope that it will be saved for us all to enjoy in the future and I will be able to take visitors there one day.

On the 5th May I have organised a day outing where you can enjoy the beauty of the autumn leaves at Tall Timbers at Piedmont near Noojee, lunch at Neerim South Hotel and in the afternoon the opportunity for you to experience the uniqueness of Coromandel. Travel will be by car and the cost will be minimal. More information can be found below.

 

Unfortunately, I have not been able to obtain a speaker on the subject of mushrooms for our meeting on the 23rd of May, however I hope you will enjoy my session on “Technology and Gardening” which I recently presented at Drouin Anglican Church with the Planter Box Project and was well received. During this session I will incorporate a section on identifying mushrooms.

Life has been so busy lately my garden has been sadly neglected and I really need to get in and pull out the tomatoes which still have lots of big green tomatoes on them and then prepare the bed for winter and follow Ralph’s recommendation of jobs to do in the garden. It looks like I’ll be busy making green tomato pickles, which my family love. As they say, “No rest for the wicked.”

Time to sign off as the natives, my adorable granddaughters, are starting to get restless and it’s morning teatime. Where do children get all their energy and where do they put all that food?

Happy Gardening, Joy

 

 

DAY TRIP TO TALL TIMBERS & COROMANDEL ARBORETUM

5th MAY 10.00a.m

LEAVING FROM WARRAGUL GOODS SHED (near the Warragul Train Station car park)

OR DROUIN BOWLING CLUB

  • Everyone who wishes to go please let me know and let me know which departure point you will waiting at for a 10.00am departure.
  • We will carpool.
  • If you can take other people with you, please let me know either by email d.j.vikas@bigpond.com or phone 0407455299
  • If you want a lift, please let us know and we will organise it for you.
  • Cost is only $10.00 entry to Tall Timbers, which the owners will donate to charity
  • Morning tea will be provided by them upon arrival at Tall Timbers
  • Lunch will be at Neerim South Pub at your own cost. A very good Senior’s meal is available.
  • We will then leave to visit Coromandel Arboretum on East West Road. Jan Millar will meet us there and give us a tour around this beautiful garden.
  • We should be back home about 4.00pm.

LOOKING FORWARD TO SEEING YOU ON THE DAY

 

 

 

From a 1923 recipe book:

 

Tomato Sauce: Tomatoes 20lbs., Vinegar - 1 quart, salt - 6oz., sugar - 1lb., allspice - 2oz., peppercorns -1oz., cloves - 1oz., cayenne pepper - 1 teaspoonful, ground ginger - 1 teaspoonful, garlic (chopped) - 4oz., Mix all ingredients together, boil 5 or 6 hours, strain, bottle and cork tightly.

 

…and (from the same book), a cure for a ‘Stomach headache’

Sweet Nitre - 1 drachm, Sal Volatile - 1 drachm, Carbonate of Soda - 2 drachms, Water (cold) - ½ pint. 

 

Dose:  Two Tablespoonfuls three times daily.

 

Things to do in the garden in May:

 

In the vegetable garden - Sow seeds of Broad Beans, Cabbage, Turnip, Onions, Spring Onions, Snow Peas and Peas. Plant Shallots.  Plant seedlings of Lettuce, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Broccoli, Kale, Brown & Red Onions (this is the best month) Spring Onions. Sow Green Manure mix in areas not required for winter vegetables. Remove all dead beans, old sweetcorn plants, tomato plants etc., and anything that can carry over fungal infections. Allow winter frosts to have direct access to soil. Take action to deal with any Cabbage caterpillars on winter vegetables. Mavrik is probably the most effective and safe.

 

In the flower garden - Complete the planting of spring flowering bulbs. The ground temperature is probably too low for the germination of most flower seeds, so it is best to plant seedlings of Pansies, Violas, Lobelia, Alyssum, decorative Kale, Primulas, Polyanthus, Cinerarias, Dianthus, Lupins, Madeira Daisies and Cyclamen.  Most of the above are also available as potted colour.

Start tidying herbaceous borders, dividing clumps that have grown too large. Prune to shape some of the deciduous shrubs. Decide which roses need replacing. Dig them out together with a barrow full of soil. Replace with new soil and well-rotted manure or Mushroom compost. Put Seamungus in the bottom of the hole when planting new bare-rooted varieties. Leave pruning of roses until mid-June and planting new roses until June/July.

 

Lawns- Continue repairing worn patches, apply fertiliser and control weeds. New weeds will germinate in worn patches and these (especially Capeweed) are best controlled by spraying when small. Do not spray within 4 days before or after mowing. Follow chosen product directions carefully to prevent lawn damage.      

 

Fruit trees - Begin pruning peaches, plums and nectarines.  Provide support for heavily laden branches of citrus fruit to prevent breakage of branches, thinning out if necessary. Look for Scale infestation and Sooty mould. Spray with white oil or a mixture with insecticide. Remove all grass and weeds around fruit trees

 

Did you know that all the teas we drink come from the Camellia Senensis?  White tea, yellow tea, green tea, oolong tea, dark tea and black tea all come from this one variety of plant, the difference is related to the way the leaves are processed.  In Australia, tea plantations can be found in far North Queensland.

 

“You know you are a hard-core gardener if you deadhead flowers in other people’s garden”

 

Next meeting:  Monday May 23rd at 9.30am.  Doors open 9am for setting up.  Entries for show bench to be placed for judging prior to 9.30am.

Morning tea duty (May): 

Flower of the month (May): Container of Autumn flowers

Guest speaker:  “Technology and Gardening” & identifying mushrooms by Joy

 

Please support our Club sponsors:  Don’t forget to check their updates on our Club website.

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.    They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. (On the Melbourne side of Drouin) Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465
  • Drouin Nursery. Convenient for Drouin members - new owner, Andre Linossier looks forward to meeting you.  Phone 0417 041507
  • Down to Earth Garden Centre, Cnr. Longwarry & Weerong Rd, Drouin. Landscaping supplies, mulch, soil, rock, pond supplies, garden hardware. Phone 5625 5166

 

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul.  5623 1960

 

March 2022

Winners of the February show bench as judged by June Dineen.

 

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month   (Single Rose)

Heather Coustley

Carol Burns

Ralph Slaughter

One Rose      (Container)

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

One stem of other flower (not a Rose)

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Kerry Elliott

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

-

Floral Art (in water)

Heather Coustley

Hilary Height

Heather Coustley

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms, Rhizomes

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Ralph Slaughter

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

Denis Hall

Heather Coustley

-

Container of flowers

Heather Coustley

Carol Burns

Heather Coustley

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Above ground vegetable

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

Below ground vegetable

Carol Burns

Heather Coustley

Carol Burns

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

Heather Coustley

Carol Burns

-

Fruits, Nuts

Joy Vikas

Ralph Slaughter

= Robert Robinson

= Carol Burns

BEST EXHIBIT

Ralph Slaughter

 

 

Dear Fellow Gardener,

 

How true is the well-known proverb, “One gains greater perspective on and knowledge about the world, other people, and oneself when one travels to different places.”? Jim and I have just returned from a wonderful two-week holiday in Tasmania, and our son’s wedding (finally), and now I am re energised and have lots of great ideas for our garden. We spent a couple of days with my friend, Kerry, in Hobart who is what I consider an expert in Bromeliads, and I have learnt so much from her in that short time. Her garden is overrun with ‘Broms”, as she fondly refers to them, and it is magnificent. Not a patch of grass on her small suburban block and in every little crook and cranny there is another exciting place to discover something new and interesting. She attaches her Bromeliads to the trees and they just flourish! Her collection consists of hundreds of different varieties, just stunning and what an amazing plant they are. She is so knowledgeable that while we were in the conservatorium at the Botanical Gardens, she was telling me about one of the “Broms” on display and a total stranger came up to us and asked her for some advice about his “Broms”. Kerry had no trouble helping him at all and the stranger left a very happy man. The Botanical gardens were fabulous and no I won’t be asking Jim to build me any ponds, stairs, or bridges but I have a couple of small projects in mind! Sadly, it was very concerning to see the west coast and the stunning rainforests so dry as strangely they have not had their usual rainfall this summer. Mother Nature certainly acts in strange ways when we see so many poor people in NSW and Queensland flooded due to the incredible rain they have experienced this year. My heart goes out to them all.

 

On a brighter note, and still thinking of broadening your mind with travel. I hope you will enjoy this week’s speaker, Raymond from Tour Local, who has designed a trip that I think will certainly enthuse all who love gardens, later this year. Also, if you don’t want to travel too far don’t forget the International Garden and Flower Show in Melbourne where I know you will gain lots of ideas and add to your knowledge of gardening. I for one am really looking forward to Thursday 31st March.

The only problem with going away is of course when you get home you find a lot of weeds have taken over and now I have quite a lot of work ahead of me. I’ve got a bit of a jungle in our back yard, and I will certainly be reading and taking advice from Ralph, as the weather is getting cooler, and we must start to prepare our garden for the colder months ahead.

Looking forward to seeing you on Monday 28th March for the AGM, which will also be a Q & A session, and we will be having a glimpse of what you can expect with a trip to Toowoomba, courtesy of Irene. Bring your questions, and solutions, with you and good luck to all who will be exhibiting on the show bench after we all know how and what to exhibit from

Happy Gardening,  Joy

 

Things to do in the garden in April.

General

Autumn, while the soil is still warm, is a good time to replace and plant new shrubs, as they have several months to establish a good root system, which goes deep, before the hot days of summer. Dig the hole twice the size of the pot and fill in with good topsoil. Use a good planting fertiliser such as Seamungus, which has root stimulant properties.

 

Flower garden.

Plant Sweet Pea seeds. Plant seeds of Viola, Pansy, Calendula, Cineraria, Alyssum, and Primulas. Seedlings of Polyanthus, Hollyhocks, Lupins, Stocks, Verbena, Iceland Poppy, Pansy and Viola planted now will begin to flower early and then flower right through winter. Plant Pansies in a slightly shaded position for the Spring as they are not as heat resistant as Violas. Spring bulbs such as Tulips and Daffodils are best given 3-4 weeks in the fridge in brown paper bags before planting to simulate winter. Taking them out convinces them that winter is over! Bulb planting should be complete by the end of the month. Select and plant new Camellias. Sasanquas should be in flower by the end of the month. Spray roses with Mancozeb to prevent Mildew.

 

Vegetable Garden.

Prepare good garden beds before planting winter vegetables such as Cauliflower, Cabbage and Broccoli. Dig plenty of organic compost and manure into the soil and then apply a good dressing of lime as most soils in the area are slightly acid and brassicas like a neutral Ph. Plant Onions, Shallots, Peas, Parsnips, more cabbage for continuity, Chinese Cabbage and Celery. Look out for the caterpillars of the White Cabbage Butterfly. Mavrik is an effective spray or Dipel for organic gardeners.

 

Home Orchard.

Complete giving Citrus trees a dressing of a good Fruit Tree & Citrus fertiliser (Gigantic from Neutrog is excellent) to swell the size of the fruit and to improve sweetness. Water-in the fertiliser thoroughly and remove all weeds from the base of the trees. Plant new or replacement trees. Lemons, Oranges, Grapefruit and Mandarins all do well in this local area.

 

Lawns.

March and April are the best months to sow new Lawns, with seed usually germinating in less than a week. The use of a Lawn Starter fertiliser when sowing the seed will pay dividends. It is also the best time to repair patches in old lawns. If, after rain, lots of weed seedlings occur, use a recommended lawn weeder spray.

 

 

To ‘bee’ or not to ‘bee’:  Some interesting facts.

  • A queen bee only uses her stinger to sting another queen bee.
  • Bees have five eyes.
  • Honeybees kill more people than venomous snakes do.
  • A bee needs to flap its wings 250 times per second to remain in the air.
  • Bees are born fully grown.

 

 

Worker honeybees have different jobs according to their age. 

  • 1-2 days old they clean the cells including the one they were born in and keep the brood warm.
  • 3-5 days old they feed the older larvae.
  • 6-11 days old they feed the youngest larvae.
  • 12-17 days old they are producing wax, carrying food, building combs and have undertaker duties.
  • 18-21 days old they protect the hive entrance and perform guard duty.
  • 22 days until death (approx. 40-45 days) they fly from the hive to collect pollen, nectar, and water.

 

Coromandel:  Kerry Elliott spoke at our last meeting about the plan to save the Coromanel Arboretum. The developer has agreed to retain the property but the on-going future upkeep is the issue.  The property at 426 East West Road, was planted many years ago with an amazing collection of trees, some rare.  The daughter of the original owner welcomes a visit by our club to view this 5-acre garden.  The visit is planned for  Thursday, 5th May.

 

Fertilizer orders:  The cut-off date for the orders to be in is 11th April for 6th May delivery.

 

Garden Club vests:  There are a number of vests which were ordered and need to be collected and paid for.  They will be offered for resale unless claimed.

 

National Eucalypt Day 2022 will be celebrated in Gippsland at two locations – 731 Mardan Rd., Leongatha 10am-4pm on March 26th & 27th and Korumburra Botanic Park, with a guided tour at 2pm on Sat 26th March.  Entry fee at both locations is by a small donation. Sponsored in Gippsland by Korumburra Horticultural Society, Friends of Korumburra Botanic Park & Friends of Ritchie Reserve.  Further information please contact Richard Lester 0419 624 122 or lesterrc46@gmail.com

 

Melbourne Flower & Garden Show:  Bus trip on Thursday 31st March.  Departing Burke Street, Warragul at 8am, picking up at Drouin (near the car wash).  Return approximately 5pm.  Bus cost $25 (cash in a named envelope with pick up point specified), Tickets for the garden show entry available on-line - $26 Concession (+ booking fee $1.95 as per their website www.melbflowershow.com )  Friends and non-members are welcome to join us. Masks & vaccination proof required.

 

Next meeting:  Tuesday 26th April commencing at 9.30am.  Doors open 9am for setting up.  Entries for show bench to be placed for judging prior to 9.30am. Anzac Day is the same day as our next scheduled meeting, so we are changing to the day after. Please let others know.

 

Morning tea duty (April):  Jan, Kath, Kerry

Flower of the month (April): Container of Chrysanthemums

Guest speaker:  David Musker from Broughton Hall

 

Please support our Club sponsors:  Don’t forget to check their updates on our Club website.

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.    They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. (On the Melbourne side of Drouin) Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465
  • Drouin Nursery. Convenient for Drouin members - new owner, Andre Linossier looks forward to meeting you.  Phone 0417 041507
  • Down to Earth Garden Centre, Cnr. Longwarry & Weerong Rd, Drouin. Landscaping supplies, mulch, soil, rock, pond supplies, garden hardware. Phone 5625 5166