June 2019

Winners of the show bench sections in May as judged by Dawn Gough

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month

Aileen White

Lorraine Barrett

Lorraine Barrett

One Rose  

Carol Burns

Aileen White

Ralph Slaughter

One stem of other flower (not a Rose)

Diane Dalton

Aileen White

Aileen White

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Aileen White

Annette Willmott

Annette Willmott

Floral Art (in water)

June Dineen

Annette Willmott

Annette Willmott

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms, Rhizomes

Robyn Hill

Aileen White

Aileen White

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

Aileen White

Aileen White

Diane Dalton

Container of flowers

Aileen White

-

-

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Kerry Elliott

Ralph Slaughter

= Aileen White

= Aileen White

Above ground vegetable

Carol Burns

Diane Dalton

Carol Burns

Below ground vegetable

Carol Burns

Carol Burns

-

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

Carol Burns

Aileen White

-

Fruits, Nuts

Aileen White

Aileen White

Aileen White

BEST EXHIBIT

Robyn Hill

 

 

A couple of changes to our show bench: 

  • A novice section for new exhibitors will be available.
  • Flowers & plants can now have the name of the exhibit displayed for the information of members. Exhibitor’s name must be placed face down in front of exhibit.

 

Today’s speaker:  Organic Gardening – myths and truths.

 

Question… What well known flower is related to apples, peaches and strawberries?  Answer below.

 

Places to go and things to do:

  • Saturday13th &  Sunday 14th July. Marybyrnong Orchids – Winter Show. 9am-4pm. Demos, trading table. $5 entry. www.mosorchids.org  Further details: 0431 580718
  • Sunday 28th July. Werribee Park Heritage Orchard. Heritage Fruit Tree Festival.  10am-3pm. Australia’s largest grafting event.  Workshops, food, activities, rare & heritage tree sales (trees from $15). Enquiries – Craig Castree 0411 720 283.

 

Things to do in the garden in July:

July is often the coldest and quietest month in the garden but there are important tasks to complete. Get rid of dead and dying shrubs and summer annuals but don’t be in a hurry to prune back the tops of shrubs like Hydrangeas until the danger of frost is past. It is also the best month to plant new bare-root trees & shrubs.

 

Flower Garden:

Continue pruning, tidying and dividing herbaceous perennials, plant seedlings of Iceland Poppy, Cineraria, Calendula, Pansies and Violas. Plant potted colour of Primulas, Alyssum, Lobelia, Primrose, Snapdragon, Pansies, Violas, Phlox and Armeria. Prune roses, clear away all dead leaves and old mulch as it will harbour fungus spores. Then spray the roses and the surrounding area with Lime Sulphur. This is the best time to check irrigation systems, Fork in Seamungus pellets and apply a dressing of lime.

Vegetable Garden

Plant Spinach, Parsley, Broad Beans, Celery. Plant seedlings of Cabbage, Cauliflower, Broccoli, Onions & Leeks. Purchase seed potatoes and set up in trays in the shed or garage to sprout ready for planting in August. Plant new Rhubarb crowns. Sow seed mixture to dig in as green manure. Start planting seeds of Tomatoes in the greenhouse for an early crop.

Lawns:

Continue weed control. De-thatch and aerate as necessary. Do not apply fertiliser until mid-August.

Orchard:

Prune deciduous trees. Start with Plums, Nectarines & Peaches. Apples and Pears can be left until August. Cut out old raspberry canes and tie in place new ones.

Special Winter Job: Don’t forget to give all the garden tools a clean and sharpen ready for the busy Spring season.

Have you paid your annual fees yet?….. they are due and payable $15 per person.

 

A reminder – There will be a plant auction at our August meeting, so anything from your garden that can be potted up now will be gratefully accepted on the day.

 

If you answer the phone with ‘Hello, you’re on the air!’  Most telemarketers will quickly hang up.

 

Next meeting:  Monday, 22nd July 2019 commencing at 9.45am.  Doors open 9am for setting up.  Entries for show bench to be placed for judging prior to 9.30am.

Guest speaker:  Joy Vickas – ‘weeds’

Morning tea duty (July):  Bev Mentiplay & Carol Burns

Flower of the month (July): Three different Camellias

 

Answer to question:  A Rose.

 

Please support our Club sponsors: 

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.  rowes@dcsi.net.au  They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. (On the Melbourne side of Drouin) Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

 

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul.  5623 1960

 

May 2019

Winners of the show bench sections in April as judged by Judith Hopkins

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month

Heather Coustley

Robyn Hill

Heather Coustley

One Rose  

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

 

One stem of other flower (not a Rose)

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Carol Burns

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Heather Coustley

 

 

Floral Art (in water)

June Dineen

Heather Coustley

Annette Willmott

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms, Rhizomes

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Robyn Hill

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

Robyn Hill

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Container of flowers

Heather Coustley

Diane Dalton

Shirley Hall

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Heather Coustley

Jan Swan

 

Above ground vegetable

Judy Butler

Ralph Slaughter

= Carol Burns

= Zelma

Below ground vegetable

Carol Burns

Judy Butler

Carol Burns

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

Heather Coustley

 

 

Fruits, Nuts

Carol Burns

Carol Burns

Heather Coustley

BEST EXHIBIT

June Dineen

 

 

Places to go and things to do:

  • RHSV Gardener’s Day out 2019  Saturday 15th June. Deakin University campus, Burwood Highway, Burwood.  Ample under cover parking.  Admission $15.  Three fantastic presentations by Diana Sargeant (Roses), John Arnott (Cranbourne Botanical Gardens) and Angus Stewart (horticulturist, author & media personality).  Many specialist plant sellers and allied stalls, hanging basket awards, and much more.  Lunch available.  Contact RHSV Secretary 03 5367 6363 or email plantzia@bigpond.com  They advise to book early.

 

Today’s guest speaker:  Steve Rowe.  ‘Success with Avocadoes in Victoria’.

 

Things to do in the garden in June:

June is the official start of Winter and frosts can be expected. When they occur protect frost sensitive plants by putting a few sheets of newspaper over them. Better still, purchase a roll of frost protectant fabric and cover with that. It is claimed that the material increases the temperature on the plant by as much as 3 degrees. June/July is the best time to empty compost bins and dig the rotted compost into the garden. Then apply a good dressing of lime (but not for Camellias, Azaleas, Rhododendrons and Daphne)

Flower garden.

Begin Rose pruning around the middle of the month but if necessary, in frost prone areas, delay for a few weeks as severe frosts can be experienced in July and August. Pruning promotes new growth, and this can be burned by frosts.  Do not put rose prunings in your compost.  Remove all dead leaves and old mulch and spray with Lime Sulphur or Copper Oxychloride on the bushes and all around them. Install and repair any watering systems as this is the best time to get easy access.

Plant seedlings or potted colour of Calendula, Cornflower, Stocks, Snapdragons, Pansies and Violas. Select and plant replacement shrubs. Divide Perennials.

Vegetable Garden.

Plant Cauliflower, Broccoli, Kale and Cabbage. The White Butterfly season should be over by now but keep an eye out for snails and slugs. Plant peas, Broad Beans, Lettuce, Shallots, Onions and Spring Onions. Divide and plant Rhubarb Crowns.

Home Orchard.

Select and plant new bare-root trees including Plums, Apricots, Apples, Nectarines, Peaches and Pears, all of which do well in this area. Commence pruning all the above. Clear away all dead leaves and the remains of fruit and spray with Lime Sulphur.

Lawns.

The autumn rain will have encouraged weeds to grow. Spray with a recommended weedicide. De-thatch thick lawns followed by mowing, aerating, and applying a good fertiliser.

Where do Cabbage white butterflies go in Winter?

Being an introduced species from Europe, they are well adapted to cold weather. Their larvae can survive a bit of frost but if very cold weather persisted it would kill them – so they avoid it by pupating. The pupae go into hibernation, where further development is suspended. These butterflies emerge from their winter sleep in early spring. The Cabbage white butterfly is one of many insects whose cells manufacture antifreeze proteins which lower the freezing point of their body fluids by about 6°C. Cabbage white pupae can survive temperatures as low as minus 20 deg.C. for short periods of time.

From a Parish Newsletter: “Don’t forget our big garage sale this Saturday. Now’s the time to get rid of all those things you don’t need anymore. Bring your husbands along”.

A reminder:  At the conclusion of each meeting could members please put their own chair away.  Please also assist those who are physically unable to carry a chair.

Next meeting:  Monday, 24th June 2019 commencing at 9.45am.  Doors open 9am for setting up.  Entries for show bench to be placed for judging prior to 9.30am. 

Morning tea duty (June):  Gaylene Slaughter, Carla, Val Dack

Flower of the month (June): One stem of Australian native flower.

 

Please support our Club sponsors: 

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.  rowes@dcsi.net.au  They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. (On the Melbourne side of Drouin) Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

 

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul.  5623 1960

April 2019

Winners of the show bench sections in March as judged by Kathy John

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month

Annette Willmott

Aileen White

Kerry Elliott

One Rose  

-

 

 

One stem of other flower (not a Rose)

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Hilary Height

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Aileen White

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Floral Art (in water)

Heather Coustley

Annette Willmott

Heather Coustley

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms, Rhizomes

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Jan Swan

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Robyn Hill

Container of flowers

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

Heather Coustley

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Aileen White

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

Above ground vegetable

N. O’Dea

Carol Burns

Heather Coustley

Below ground vegetable

Carol Burns

Carol Burns

Carol Burns

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

Carol Burns

Fruits, Nuts

Aileen White

N. O’Dea

Ralph Slaughter

BEST EXHIBIT

Heather Coustley

 

 

AGM:  At the March meeting we welcomed some new faces onto the Committee for the ensuing year.

President:  Ralph Slaughter, Secretary: Judy Butler, Treasurer:  Rob Coustley, Vice President: Henry Cotton (by acclamation), Assistant Secretary: Irene Rolfe (by acclamation), Assistant Treasurer: Gaylene Slaughter, Technical Support: Howard Sharman & Joy Vikas, Trip Co-ordinators:  Howard Sharman & Ralph Slaughter, Newsletter: Irene Rolfe, Door Stewards: Ruth Waring & Mary Anglin, Show Bench Stewards: Marj Blair & Jan Swan, Trading table: Jan Swan & Carrie Briggs.

 

Annual membership fee:  $15 per person is now due and payable.  This covers insurance.  The meeting fee of $2 goes towards the cost of hall rental and morning tea.

 

Today’s guest speaker:  A representative from Access Rehabilitation Equipment, who we purchased the wheelchairs and walkers from, will show other aids that can help with daily living.  We will also have a presentation of what the Hunter Valley Gardens have to offer.

 

Places to go and things to do:

  • Melbourne Friends of Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria.  Growing friends 2019 Autumn Plant Sale.  Saturday, 4th May 10am – 4pm & Sunday 5th May 10am – 3pm. Entry is free. Enter the gardens through Gate E on Birdwood Avenue.  For further information phone 9650 7398 or email friends@frbgmelb.org.au Catalogue of plants available will be on the friends website one week prior to the sale www.rbgfriendsmelb.org
  • Garden Club Autumn Colours bus trip:  Thursday, May 9th departing Warragul (Burke Street) at 8.30am and Drouin (bus stop west of the Bowling Club) at 8.45am and travelling to the Dandenongs.  Places to visit are the Alfred Nicholas Memorial Gardens and George Tindale Memorial Gardens, both at Sherbrook and the Wishing Well nursery at Monbulk.  Lunch venue to be decided (at your own cost).  Price is $22 for members and $27 for non-members. Payments being taken by our treasurer.  Bookings to be made with Howard 5622 3184 or 0449 619 990 or Email : hasjds@gmail.com   Bookings limited to 54 places.
  • All Things Rose:  Everything is coming up roses at the Leongatha Community House between May and October this year. A project in partnership with the Leongatha Horticultural Society aims to introduce and inform all those interested in appreciating, creating and learning about all things rose.

Workshops commencing on May 2nd with a meet and greet, cover selecting, growing and using fresh roses, various rose crafts & art (including using rose hips, beading, quilting) and visits to gardens and nurseries. All this leading up to the 48th Leongatha Rose Spectacular on 8th & 9th November.  Cost of workshops vary but start at $10. Further information can be found on www.leongathahorticulturalsociety.com.au or by phoning Eunice 5662 3962 or Lillian 5657 3268.

 

Things to do in the garden in May:

In the vegetable garden - Sow seed of Broad Beans, Cabbage, Turnip, Onions, Spring Onions, Snow Peas and Peas. Plant Shallots.  Plant seedlings of Lettuce, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Broccoli, Kale, brown & Red Onions (this is the best month) Spring Onions. Sow Green Manure mix in areas not required for winter vegetables. Remove all dead beans, old sweetcorn plants, tomato plants etc., and anything that can carry over fungal infections. Allow winter frosts to have direct access to soil. 

In the flower garden - Complete the planting of spring flowering bulbs. The ground temperature is probably too low for the germination of most flower seeds, so it is best to plant seedlings of Pansies, Violas, Lobelia, Alyssum, decorative Kale, Primulas, Polyanthus, Cinerarias, Dianthus, Lupins, Madeira daisies and Cyclamen.  Most of the above are also available as potted colour.

Start tidying herbaceous borders, dividing clumps that have grown too large. Prune to shape some of the deciduous shrubs.Decide which roses need replacing. Dig them out together with a barrow full of soil. Replace with new soil and well-rotted manure or compost. Leave pruning roses until mid-June and planting new roses until June/July.

Lawns- Continue repairing worn patches, apply fertiliser and control weeds. New weeds will germinate in worn patches and these (especially Capeweed) are best controlled by spraying when small. Do not spray within 4 days before or after mowing. Follow chosen product directions carefully to prevent lawn damage.      

Fruit trees - Begin pruning peaches, plums and nectarines.  Provide support for heavily laden branches of citrus fruit to prevent breakage of branches. Look for Scale infestation and Sooty mould. Spray with white oil or a mixture with insecticide.

 Quote: “You know you are a gardening fanatic when you have more pairs of gardening gloves than you have pairs of socks”

A reminder:  At the conclusion of each meeting can members please put their own chair away.  Could members also assist those who are physically unable to carry a chair.

Next meeting:  Monday, 27th May 2019 commencing at 9.45am.  Doors open 9am for setting up.  Entries for show bench to be placed for judging prior to 9.30am. 

Morning tea duty (May):  June Dineen, Dawn Gough, Joy Vikas

Flower of the month (May): Container of autumn flowers

 

Please support our Club sponsors: 

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.  rowes@dcsi.net.au  They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. (On the Melbourne side of Drouin) Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

 

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul.  5623 1960