March 2018

March 2018

Winners of the show bench sections in February as judged by Judy Hopkins

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month

Maurice Cunningham

Heather Coustley

Maurice Cunningham

One Rose

Aileen White

M. Cunningham

Aileen White

One stem of other flower (not a Rose)

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Aileen White

Aileen White

Heather Coustley

Floral Art (in water)

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

 

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms Rhizomes

Aileen White

Aileen White

Heather Coustley

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

= Kerry Elliott

= Ingrid Tully

Container of flowers

Ralph Slaughter

Aileen White

Aileen White

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

Aileen White

Above ground vegetable

Judy Butler

Carol Burns

Carol Burns

Below ground vegetable

Carol Burns

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

Heather Coustley

Ralph Slaughter

= Aileen White

= Aileen White

Fruits, Nuts

Zelma

Ralph Slaughter

Carol Burns

BEST EXHIBIT

Maurice Cunningham

 

 

 

Places to go and things to do:

  • Tesselaar Festival of Flowers. Fri 30 March – Sun 15th April. (Gardening & Plant expo 14th & 15th April).  Entertainment, activities & food.  $25/$22 Conc. entry.  Silvan.  03 9737 7722
  • Mornington Peninsula Bonsai Society 39th Annual Easter Show.  Sat 31 Mar 9am-5pm & Sun 1 April 10am-4pm.  Displays, demonstrations, sales.  Entry $5/$4 conc.  Bruce 0439 377996 or Jillian 0407 361989.
  • Brighton Floral Art Group Festival of Flowers. Exhibits, plants for sale, Devonshire tea. Sat 14th April 1– 4pm. $5 entry. St Leonards Uniting Church Hall, Brighton.  Jane Scott-Price 9533 5128
  • Victorian Native Bonsai Club 2018 exhibition. Sat 14th & Sun 15th April, 9am – 4pm. $5 entry.  Australian native pre-bonsai stock for sale and Bonsai related items.  Domain House, Dallas Brooks Dve, Royal Bot. Gardens, Melbourne.  secnativeclub@gmail.com  & www.vicnativebonsai.com.au
  • Ferny Creek Horticultural Soc. Autumn show.  Sat 21st (12–4pm) & Sun 22nd April (10am–4pm) Judged displays, guided walks of 4ha garden, photographic display, sales of rare plants & cut flowers, refreshments.  Free parking, $5 entry (U14 free).  Hilton Rd., Sassafras. 0421 748949 publicity@fchs.org.au
  • Melbourne Friends of Royal Botanic Gardens Autumn plant sale. Sat 28th (10am-4pm) & Sun 29th (10am-3pm) April. Plants sourced mostly from stock within Botanic Gardens. Plants listed on website one week prior. Free entry (enter via Gate E, Birdwood Ave.)  Ph. 03 9650 6398.
  • Australian Plants Society.  Yarra Yarra Group – Native plant & Book Sale. Sat 28th April.  Huge range of natives & indigenous plants inc. short & tall grafts.  Various suppliers in attendance. Senior Citizens Centre, 903 Main St. Eltham. Phone 03 9439 7228

 

A policeman pulled up next to the guy unloading garbage out of his ute into the ditch. The policeman asked, “Why are you dumping garbage in the ditch? Don’t you see that sign right over your head?” “Yep,” he replied.  “That’s why I’m dumpin’ it here, ‘cause it says: ‘Fine For Dumping Garbage.’”

Garden Club bus trip:

A trip to Geelong Botanic Gardens and Country Farm Dahlias at Winchelsea has been organised for Monday 23rd April.  Cost is $31 for Members and $36 for non-members.  Bus departs Burke Street, Warragul at 8am, Drouin (near Bowling Club) 8.15am, and Pakenham approx. 8.40am.  For bookings contact Howard 5622 3184 or 0449 619990 or hasjds@gmail.com

Geelong Botanic Gardens are part of the 200-acre Eastern Park established in 1851.  The gardens contain collections of Roses, Pelargoniums, Salvias and significant trees.

Country Farm Dahlias at Winchelsea covers two acres and contains 20,000 Dahlias.

 

Today:  Tips, questions and answers.

Today’s Morning tea duty:  Michelle & Bev.

 

Things to do in the garden in April:

The continuing dry weather through March is shortening the Autumn planting season before the soil cools. Therefore, as soon as sufficient rain has fallen it is time to get plantings of seeds, seedlings and lawn repair underway.

Flower garden. Plant Sweet Pea seeds. Plant seeds of Viola, Pansy, Calendula Cineraria, Alyssum, and Primulas. Seedlings of Polyanthus, Hollyhocks, Lupins, Stocks, Verbena, Iceland Poppy, Pansy and Viola planted now will begin to flower early and then flower right through winter. Violas will flower right through until the end of November, especially if grown in pots. Plant Pansies in a slightly shaded position for the Spring as they are not as heat resistant as Violas. Spring bulbs such as Tulips and Daffodils are best given 3-4 weeks in the fridge in brown paper bags before planting. This convinces them that winter is over! Bulb planting should be complete by the end of the month. Select and plant new Camellias.

Vegetable Garden. Prepare good garden beds before planting winter vegetables such as Cauliflower, Cabbage and Broccoli. Dig plenty of organic compost and manure into the soil and then apply a good dressing of lime as most soils in the area are slightly acid and brassicas like a neutral Ph. Plant Onions, Shallots, Peas, parsnips, more cabbage for continuity, Chinese Cabbage and Celery.

Home Orchard. Complete giving Citrus trees a dressing of a good Fruit Tree & Citrus fertiliser to swell the size of the fruit and to improve sweetness. Water the fertiliser in thoroughly and remove all weeds from the base of the trees. Plant new or replacement trees. Lemons, Oranges, Grapefruit and Mandarins all do well in this local area.

Lawns.  March and April are the best months to sow new Lawns, with seed usually germinating in less than a week. The use of a Lawn Starter fertiliser when sowing the seed will pay dividends. It is also the best time to repair patches in old lawns. If after rain lots of weed seedlings occur use a recommended lawn weeder spray.

 

Flower of the month for April:  Container of Chrysanthemums.

 

Next meeting:  Monday 30th April, commencing at 9.45am.  (Please note change of date, due to bus trip on our normal day.)  Doors open 9am for setting up.  Entries for show bench to be placed for judging prior to 9.30am.  Morning tea duty (April): Garry & Judy.

 

Please support our Club sponsors:

 

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.  rowes@dcsi.net.au  They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

 

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul.  5623 1960

 

February

                  February 2018

Winners of the show bench sections in January as judged by Dawn Gough

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month

Ralph Slaughter

Robyn Hill

Aileen White

One Rose

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

One stem of other flower (not a Rose)

Aileen White

Ralph Slaughter

Marie Woolan

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Bev Mentiplay

Aileen White

Aileen White

Floral Art

June Dineen

June Dineen

Aileen White

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms Rhizomes

Aileen White

Robyn Hill

M. Cunningham

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

Bev Mentiplay

Aileen White

Robyn Hill

Container of flowers

Aileen White

Aileen White

Carol Burns

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Aileen White

Bev Mentiplay

Alan Saunders

Above ground vegetable

Carrie Briggs

= Judy Butler

= Ralph Slaughter

Judy Butler

Below ground vegetable

Carol Burns

Carol Burns

Judy Butler

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

Ralph Slaughter

Carol Burns

Aileen White

Fruits, Nuts

Carol Burns

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

BEST EXHIBIT

Aileen White

 

 

 

Places to go and things to do:

  • Cranbourne Friends Botanic Gardens Autumn Plant Sale.  Sat 17th & Sun 18th March 10am – 4pm.  Catalogue on line one week prior.  Free entry.  www.rbgfriendscranbourne.org.au
  • Ferny Creek Horticultural Society Plant Collectors Sale & Garden Expo.  Sat 10th & Sun 11 March 10am – 4pm.  $5 entry.  Rare plants sale, books, garden tools, botanical artist, wood turning.  Refreshments, guided garden walks, free parking. 100 Hilton Road Sassafras. 0421 748949.
  • Melbourne International Flower and Garden Show.  Wed 21st March to Sun 25th March.  Carlton Gardens.  Secretary:  03 5367 6363.
  • Tesselaar Festival of Flowers. Fri 30 March – Sun 15th April. (Gardening & Plant expo 14th & 15th April).  Entertainment, activities & food.  $25/$22 Conc. entry.  Silvan.  03 9737 7722
  • Mornington Peninsula Bonsai Society 39th Annual Easter Show.  Sat 31 Mar 9am-5pm & Sun 1 April 10am-4pm.  Displays, demonstrations, sales.  Entry $5/$4 conc.  Bruce 0439 377996 or Jillian 0407 361989.

 

Today’s guest speaker:  Colin Jackson from the Native Plant Society of West Gippsland who will talk on ‘using natives in your garden’.

 

Today’s morning tea duty:  Ann and Carla

 

AGM:  March is our annual meeting when elections are held for office bearer positions.  Nominations need to be in prior to the meeting.  Some new faces on the committee would be very welcome, so please consider this.

 

 

The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago.  The second-best time is now.

 

Things to do in the garden in March:

 

With warmth still in the ground and providing Autumn rains appear, March is a good month for planting. Newly planted seedlings produce new growth quickly while new shrubs and trees begin their establishment phase by producing new roots right through the winter.

Flower garden. Plant Sweet Pea seeds. Plant seeds of Viola, Pansy, Calendula and Primula. Seedlings of Pansy and Viola planted now will begin to flower early and then flower right through winter. Violas such as Micky, Honey Bee and Blue Porcelain will flower right through until the end of November, especially if grown in pots.  Select and start planting spring flowering bulbs.

Vegetable Garden. Prepare good garden beds before planting winter vegetables such as Cauliflower, Cabbage and Broccoli. Planted in March, harvesting will begin in June. Dig plenty of organic compost and manure into the soil and then apply a good dressing of lime as most soils in the area are slightly acid and brassicas like a neutral Ph.

Home Orchard. Give all Citrus trees a dressing of a good Tree & Citrus fertiliser to swell the size of the fruit and improve sweetness. If the weather is dry, water the fertiliser in thoroughly and remove all weeds from the base of the tree. Plant new or replacement trees. Lemons, Oranges, Grapefruit and Mandarins all do well in this local area.

Lawns.  March and April are the best months to sow new Lawns , with seed usually germinating in less than a week. Remember to use a Lawn Starter fertiliser when sowing the seed. It is also the best time to repair patches in old lawns.

 

I dropped a bottle of sauce on my foot.  It caused immense pain To-ma-toe.

 

A Gardener’s Proposal: 

I feel so Melon-Caulie dear, since you’ve bean away

The Thyme has passed so very sloe, I Pine for Yew all day.

No Sugar Beets your sweetness,

Don’t turnip your nose to me,

But take this 18 carrot ring and lettuce marry be.

 

(Sloe is the fruit of the Blackthorn plant and looks similar to a ripe blueberry.  It is a cousin to the damson and cherry plum, is sour and can be used to make Gin.)

 

Handy Hint:  If lemons are scarce and expensive and you need a small quantity of lemon juice, roll the lemon with your hands on a hard surface then pierce the end of the lemon (not the stem end) with a skewer and squeeze out desired amount of juice.  Store the lemon in fridge for later use.

 

 

Flower of the month for March:  One Rose.

 

Next meeting:  Monday 26th March, commencing at 9.45am.  Doors open 9am for setting up.  Entries for show bench to be placed for judging prior to 9.30am.  Morning tea duty: Michelle and Bev.

 

Please support our Club sponsors:

 

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.  rowes@dcsi.net.au  They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

 

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul.  5623 1960

January '18

Winners of the show bench sections in November

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month

Aileen White

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

One Rose

Aileen White

Judy Butler

Ralph Slaughter

One stem other flower (not a Rose)

Aileen White

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Aileen White

Aileen White

Judy Butler

Floral Art

Heather Coustley

June Dineen

Ralph Slaughter

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms Rhizomes

Heather Coustley

Carol Burns

Judy Butler

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

Aileen White

Heather Coustley

Judy Butler

Container of flowers

Aileen White

Aileen White

Heather Coustley

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Aileen White

Aileen White

Ingrid Tully

Above ground vegetable

Ralph Slaughter

Ralph Slaughter

Carol Burns

Below ground vegetable

Judy Butler

Judy Butler

-

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

Heather Coustley

Ralph Slaughter

Carol Burns

Fruits, Nuts

Judy Butler

Judy Butler

Robyn Hill

BEST EXHIBIT

Heather Coustley

 

 

 

2017 Aggregate winners.  Congratulations to all.

Section A:    1st Aileen White 113 points.     2nd Heather Coustley 49 points.

Section B:    Equal 1st - Aileen White and Judy Butler 19 points.

Section C:    1st Aileen White 91 points         2nd. Heather Coustley 41 points.

Section D:    1st Carol Burns 77 points           2nd. Judy Butler 75 points.

 

Places to go and things to do:

 

  • Werribee Park Heritage Orchard Grafting Day.  Sun 11th Feb.  Orchard tours, plant stalls, free entry, gold coin for parking. www.werribeeparkheritageorchard.org.au
  • State Dahlia Show. Sat 24th/Sun 25th Feb. Displays, sales. Mt Waverley Youth Centre. Entry $5, pensioners $2, children free. 0419 221200
  • Melbourne Begonia Society.  Sat 24th/Sun 25th Feb. Displays, sales, information, talks.  Moorabbin Senior Citizens Hall.  Entry $3 adult.  Janeen 9579 1697 or Marilyn 9758 6642
  • Cranbourne Friends Botanic Gardens Autumn Plant Sale.  Sat 7th/Sun 18th March 10am – 4pm.  Catalogue on line one week prior.  Free entry.  www.rbgfriendscranbourne.org.au
  • Melbourne International Flower and Garden Show.  Wed 21st March to Sun 25th March.  Carlton Gardens.  Secretary:  03 5367 6363.

 

Things to do in the garden in February:

 

Flower Garden

Plant seeds of Winter flowering annuals such as Pansy, Violas, Phlox, Alyssum, Primula etc so that they become established while the soil is still warm. Complete the division of Irises and tidy up plants, removing dead leaves. Buy spring bulbs as they appear in the stores.

Cut back roses 55-65 days before Easter, providing another dose of fertiliser and a good watering so that they look great at Easter. Keep up the spraying for Aphids, Black Spot, and Downy Mildew.

 

Vegetable Garden

Plant seeds of Winter vegetables such as Brussels Sprouts, cabbage, Cauliflower, Chinese Cabbage, Leeks and Lettuce. Spring onions, Parsnips, Beetroot and Shallots can also be planted. Trim lower leaves from Tomatoes to allow quicker ripening and pinch out the tops of the plants before they get too high

 

Home Orchard

Net trees to protect fruit from birds. Carry out summer pruning of stone fruit. Watch for infestations of ‘Pear Slug’ and treat with a pyrethroid such as Maverick.

 

Lawns

Keep the mower blades high during the hot days of Summer. Provide water where necessary and a dressing of lawn fertiliser to keep the grass green and growing.

 

Did you know?  The birth flower for February is the Violet. The violet is traditionally the Valentine's Day flower.  It celebrates modesty, virtue, humility, faithfulness, and happiness. 

 

Where does our salad come from?

 

Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is a member of the daisy family andwas first cultivated in ancient Egypt. The Egyptians turned it from a weed into a plant grown for food.  The seeds of the lettuce were also used to produce oil.

 

The tomato is the edible fruit of the plant Solanum lycopersicum. Tomatoes are a member of the nightshade family.  The species originated in western South America and were known in the Spanish language as "tomate", from which the English word ‘tomato’ is derived.

 

Cucumber (Cucumis sativus) is a widely cultivated plant in the gourd family.  The cucumber is originally from India and southern Asia.

 

A couple of funnies:

An elderly couple was having a conversation over the fence with their neighbour.  ‘We used to tiptoe through the tulips, now we just waddle through the weeds.’

 

Vegetables are good for us so they say; how about carrot cake and pumpkin pie?

 

Flower of the month for February:  Container of Dahlias.

 

Next meeting:  Monday 26th February, commencing at 9.45am.  Doors open 9am for setting up.  Entries for show bench to be placed for judging prior to 9.30am.  February guest speaker:  Colin Jackson from the Native Plant Society of West Gippsland who will talk on ‘using natives in your garden’.

 

Please support our Club sponsors:

 

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.  rowes@dcsi.net.au  They have a large range of plants for sale and a wealth of garden knowledge.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices and view mature plants blooming in their large garden.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

 

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul.  5623 1960