August 2020

A note from our new President, Joy.

Dear fellow gardener,
Rain, hail and cold days and more days lost in the garden but as I write to you from the warmth of my office and a view over my garden I am not really losing time in the garden as I have been busy using the wonders of technology to discover and learn so much more about gardening these past few weeks, after all we are never too old to learn new things.
I know that there is nothing that can truly replace the knowledge and experience of our gardening club members and the expert advice we obtain from our local nurseries for all things gardening, but, if you can’t get out then there are so many resources available on the internet.
In the past week I have used the computer for a zoom meeting with our committee members, a webinar with Burnley Gardens, and I have another Zoom meeting on Wednesday with the Baw Baw Food Movement when Prue Metcalfe will be giving a power point presentation on the Planter Box Project. In addition my son has introduced me to using the Google App to identify plants. Amazing!
And the results are;
Garden Club Committee
1. We are planning to have the plant sale the 26th October at the Senior Citizens Centre.
It will be a sale, not an auction and all regulations according to the COVID situation at the time, will be adhered to. We will keep you informed as soon as we know more. I have heard that many members have their hot houses full of wonderful plants for us to purchase.
2. Club fees can be paid on-line. Please follow the instructions shown in this newsletter or if you prefer, by cheque. $15.00 per person annual fee.
3. Henry has been busy preparing a Planter Box with some fabulous herbs for a raffle to be held at the plant sale.
4. We are going to try for a Zoom meeting in 27th September for all of our members, so stay tuned for more information. (I will contact you by email if this is able to be done.)
Burnley Gardens: Hidden Resource (11)
A very interesting Webinar with tips on keeping your garden healthy in winter and beyond, and they went behind the scenes into their nursery and greenhouses. Many questions were asked of the team on a wide variety of subjects such as growing indigenous plants, gore wasps and indoor pot plants. I am currently communicating with Burnley Gardens to try and organise this informative webinar to be shown to our club members at some stage in the near future. Again I will keep you informed as to my progress.

Baw Baw Food Movement.
I am looking forward to attending this Zoom Meeting and in particular reconnecting with Prue Metcalfe concerning the Planter Box Project. This is a wonderful project with the joining of two clubs, the Drouin Men’s shed and our club and the combined aim to assist people living alone by providing them with a planter box complete with herbs and flowers. We have heard that these boxes have given many recipients a lot of pleasure.

Google App. Do you know about this wonderful app.? Simply add this app to your I Phone or Android and then when you are unable to identify a plant simply take a photograph of it and it will give you the answer within seconds. Happy exploring on the net everyone and keep warm and safe. Not long to spring. Cheers, Joy

Things to do in the Garden in September

In the vegetable garden - Sow seeds of Radish, Snow Peas & Peas, Beans, carrots, Turnips and Beetroot. Plant seedlings of Lettuce, Cabbage, Broccoli, Kale, Onions, Shallots, Radish and Silverbeet. Plant potatoes. Plant Beans, Carrots and Parsnips toward the end of the month as the soil warms. Apply Slug bait. Hoe weeds regularly. Provide support for Broad Beans. Apply Mulch & fertiliser to Strawberry beds and Rhubarb.
In the flower garden - Plant seedlings of Pansies, Violas, Lobelia, Alyssum, Dianthus, Lupins, Madeira Daisies, Marigolds, Candytuft and Cleome. Most of the above are also available as potted colour. Provide support for Sweet Peas. Plant seedlings of Dianthus, Petunias and the whole range of summer flowers that become available later this month. Apply fertiliser to Camellias and Roses. Use specific fertilisers with low phosphorus for Natives. Bush Tucker from Neutrog is now available. Watch for aphids on Roses and treat as necessary.
Lawns - Apply fertiliser. Control weeds with a broad leaf lawn weeder. Mow regularly. Check sprinkler systems. Ants often colonise them during the winter months.
Fruit trees – Prune Apple Trees. Keep the base of all fruit trees free of weeds. Spray Nectarines and Peaches for “Curly Leaf” just before flowering. Apply Citrus & Fruit Tree fertiliser to all fruit trees. Keep weeds away from all fruit trees. Protect Strawberries with suitable netting and apply slug bait to protect fruit as it ripens. Watch for Black Aphid on Plums, Nectarines and Peaches. If spraying is necessary for aphid control only spray in the early morning or late evening when bees are not around.
• Mr Bill Hill has some beautiful garden books (both reference and coffee table) he would like to give to any garden club members who are interested. They were his wife’s (a keen gardener) and he would love them to go to a good home. He can be contacted on 0458 125 139.

• If any garden club member is interested in free horse poo they can contact Rachael on 0403 860242. You will need your own trailer or bags and shovel or fork to collect it. There is easy access.

• Don’t forget to email your garden related photos to Ralph. rslau@dcsi.net

 

SAVVY SENIORS SAFER HOMES SURVEY

This survey is looking to find out how safe senior residents currently feel in their home and what resources they need to feel safe and supported.

We have been asked to encourage you to complete the survey. If you’d like a copy of the survey mailed to you with a return envelope please contact Leonie on 56242411 or via email at bawbaw@bawbawshire.vic.gov.au

 

HOW TO PAY YOUR CLUB FEES

 

ONLINE:

 

BSB: 633 108

 

Account No: 160494753

 

Reference:  (Your full name)

 

MAIL:

 

 cheque to Warragul & District Garden Club

 

                   PO BOX 731

 

                  Warragul 3820

 

 

 

BE SCAM SAVVY!

     www.seniorsonline.vic.gov.au

An excellent article by the Victoria State Government to keep you aware of scammers.

 

DO YOU NEED MASKS?

If you are having a problem with accessing masks contact Andrea at the Warragul Senior Citizens 56242803 OR you can obtain washable cotton masks at the Community House, Normanby Road.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Please support our Club sponsors: 

 Rowes nursery, Landsborough Road, Warragul. rowes@dcsi.net.au They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
 Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. (On the Melbourne side of Drouin) Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
 Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul. Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices. They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
 Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc. Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul. 5623 1960

 

July 2020

A virtual AGM has been held, with new committee members appointed via a postal vote. Ralph Slaughter, President for the last five years, has stepped aside to undertake the Presidency of the South Gippsland Group of Garden Clubs and Horticultural Societies (of which Warragul is a member) and Joy Vikas has taken over as President. Judy Butler and Rob Coustley are continuing as Secretary and Treasurer.

Anne Berkery and Gaylene Slaughter have volunteered to fill the positions of Assistant Secretary and Assistant Treasurer.  We thank them all for their contribution to our Club. We also thank Ralph, our retiring President and wish him well in his new role.  Reports on the elections have been supplied and are on record.

 

The August meeting we had hoped to have, complete with plant sale, has been postponed due to the Covid restrictions and it is hoped that we may be able try again for October 26th.  This will also give all the plants that members are propagating for the sale a bit more time to grow. The funds raised helps our Club.

 

Places to go and things to do:

Those of us residing in Baw Baw Shire are fortunate that we are still able to get out and about at this stage.  We have a couple of planned trips but will need to reassess these as we get closer to the dates.

  • Thurs. 29th Oct Visit to Country Farm Perennials, Nayook (am) and Jan’s Jindivick garden (pm) in main street, (plenty of parking) (entry $8pp), Travel by private cars.
  • Thurs 12th Nov – Rose gardens – Picardy ($15pp entry) & Crossover Rose garden ($8pp entry). Travel by private cars.

 

Jobs to do in the garden in August

August is when the ‘Gardening Year’ starts all over again. Air temperatures begin to rise but the most important is improved soil temperatures which assists both germination of seeds and new growth of plants. August is also the best time to start applying fertiliser. Mid-August is ideal as the various plants make their new roots underground. When you see new shoots appearing, not only is the plant waking up above ground but it will be doing the same below ground.

Flower Garden: Complete Rose pruning and spray with Lime Sulphur. Apply Dolomite lime. Apply rose fertiliser (Neutrog Sudden Impact or Black Marvel) during third or fourth week. Complete dividing perennials, cut back Fuchsias and prune hydrangeas back to the best big fat buds, thinning out old wood. Plant Alyssum, Aquilegias, Delphiniums, Violas, Primulas and Pansies as potted colour to get a quick result. The first petunias can be planted under cover or raised in the greenhouse. Weeds will begin to grow quickly so hoe regularly.

Vegetable Garden: Plant Cauliflower, Broccoli, Cabbage and Silverbeet. Plant seed potatoes but watch for late frost. Earth up or cover with newspaper if frost is forecast.
Prepare garden beds with top-up of soil if necessary. Apply plenty of rotted compost, Seamungus or Searles Five-in One. Then apply Dolomite lime, turning over the soil a spade depth. Peas and Snow Peas can be sown but wait until September when the soil warms, for sowing beans. Plant tomatoes under cover at the end of the month.

Lawns: This is the best month for essential weeding as the broad leaf weeds are now growing fast and will absorb the sprays well. Cape Weed will flower in October so a second spray may be needed to kill the big “Old Man” ones that can cover so much lawn. An application of some lawn seed to repair the patches left behind may be necessary. Mow regularly but not 4 days before or after the application of lawn weed spray. Yates lawn weeder, despite being the cheapest, seems to do a great job when used as directed.

 

Home Orchard: Complete pruning of Apples and Pears. Spray them with Lime Sulphur. Spray Peaches and Nectarines with Liquid Copper or other copper sprays for the control of Curly Leaf, being ready to spray as soon as bud colour is present. Spray until the product can be seen running down the trunk of the tree. Watch for the presence of Scale and “Sooty Mould” on Citrus trees and spray if necessary, with White Oil. Prune to shape after harvesting fruit. Black Peach aphid may appear on Peach, Apricot. Nectarine and especially plum trees, early in Spring so be ready to deal with it also.

 

FROM THE PRESIDENT’S GARDEN CHAIR TO YOU,

With a cuppa next to me, my Yoga session over and the house work done I can finally sit and write to you from “My room with a view to my garden”.  It is a typical wintery day but thank heavens it is not quite as cold as yesterday, and after my daily walk around my little garden I noticed signs of spring and the promise of warmer weather soon to come. My Clematis and Jasmine are covered in buds and the fruit trees are starting to show signs of bud swell. The Happy Wanderer this year is particularly “happy” and showing a magnificent display over the back fence and the Camellias have been amazing.

 

But, as you dear fellow gardeners would know, there is often something alarming happening in the garden.

I love daffodils. As a child I had many happy holidays at my cousin’s farm in Bowral, NSW, where like here, the daffodils and tulips make a spectacular display and so daffodils bring back many wonderful memories for me. BUT!! Today as I wandered around my garden I was shocked to see that something had completely eaten some of the buds off. There is no sign of snails or little insects just a big bite taken out of the bud! Does anyone have any suggestions? I’m always ready to learn.

 

And what have I learnt over the last few weeks in my Garden Chair?

Did you know that banana water is an easy way to give your indoor pot plants a boost? Pop a banana skin in a jar of water and leave it for 24 hours and then feed water to your plants. The author (News .com) said that her plants were so lush and green as a result and she also recommends putting banana skins in the compost. Banana peels contain nutrients and act as a natural fertiliser for plants, especially roses.

Another suggestion was to kick-start new plants by laying banana peels at the bottom of the hole you created in the soil and then your new plant.

The potassium in banana reportedly helps with good root and shoot growth. Another hint was to use the peel to wipe dust off indoor plant leaves. I love this hint!

I have for years always thrown my banana peels into my Staghorn and Elkhorn but now I will have to eat a lot more bananas to keep up the demand.

Keep well and safe and happy gardening, I’m off to make a banana cake. Cheers, Joy

 

Tips, Questions & Photos;  If you have any garden related photos you’d like to share on our Website please forward them to Ralph at rslau@dcsi.net.au   If you’ve heard a good garden tip or have a question please send those too.

 

Next meeting:  We have pencilled in Monday, 26th October 2020 commencing at 9.30am.  Doors open 9am for setting up.  October is our annual George Lowe Memorial Iris Competition so keep that in mind.

Flower of the month (October): One stem of Iris. 

 

Please support our Club sponsors: 

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.  rowes@dcsi.net.au  They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. (On the Melbourne side of Drouin) Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

 

 

June 2020

Winners of the show bench sections in February as judged by June Dineen.

 

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month

Carol Burns

Heather Coustley

Jan Swan

One Rose  

Aileen White

Diane Hall

Hillary Height

One stem of other flower (not a Rose)

Heather Coustley

Robyn Hill

= Kerry Elliott

= Ralph Slaughter

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Robyn Hill

Aileen White

Heather Coustley

Floral Art (in water)

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Hillary Height

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms, Rhizomes

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

Carol Burns

Heather Coustley

Robyn Hill

Container of flowers

Heather Coustley

= Carol Burns

= Diane Dalton

Diane Dalton

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

Aileen White

Above ground vegetable

Carol Burns

Zelma Cleeland

Ralph Slaughter

Below ground vegetable

Carol Burns

Ralph Slaughter

Carol Burns

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

Aileen White

Aileen White

Kerry Elliott

Fruits, Nuts

Ron Mace

Ralph Slaughter

Aileen White

Novice

A Berkley

 

BEST EXHIBIT

Carol Burns

 

The above results are for the last meeting we had prior to our Covid19 shutdown.

 

We had advice from the Royal Horticultural Society of Victoria, that we suspend meetings until further notice. Now that restrictions have eased, we plan on having our first meeting back on August 24th, with social distancing measures in place.  This meeting (depending on the latest Covid19 rules) will be feature a plant stall.  Could we ask members to please pot up a few plants now in readiness.

 

March is usually our AGM with election of office bearers.  At a Committee meeting held on 1st June a list of possible nominations for the new Committee was made and if any other club members wish to nominate or object please notify Judy by 30th June.  See separate sheet for the proposed nominations.

 

Subscriptions for the upcoming year were discussed and it was suggested they remain the same. $15 per person which covers membership and insurance. This is payable at the August meeting. Please place correct money in an envelope with your name AND address on and give to the Treasurer.

 

Places to go and things to do:

  • Why not take a drive (or walk) to some public parks and gardens?  Have a walk around, admire the gardens, get garden ideas and breathe in the fresh air (while avoiding close contact with others). 
  • On cold, wet days read some of your gardening books and magazines that you have sitting on your bookshelf or coffee table and get inspiration for new things to do in your garden.
  • Tidy the garden shed, clean up garden tools, sharpen garden stakes, take stock of what plant foods, fertilisers, pest control products etc that you have.
  • Thurs. 29th Oct Visit to Country Farm Perennials, Nayook (am) and Jan’s Jindivick garden (pm) in main street, (plenty of parking) (entry $8pp), Travel by private cars.
  • Thurs 12th Nov – Rose gardens – Picardy ($15pp entry) & Crossover Rose garden ($8pp entry). Travel by private cars.

 

Things to do in the garden in June:  June is the official start of Winter and frosts can be expected. When they occur protect frost sensitive plants. Purchase a roll of frost protectant fabric and cover with that. It is claimed that the material increases the temperature on the plant by as much as 3 degrees. Dig rotted compost into the garden. Then apply a good dressing of lime (but not for Camellias, Azaleas, Rhododendrons and Daphne).

Flower garden. Begin Rose pruning around the middle of the month but if necessary, in frost prone areas, delay for a few weeks as severe frosts can be experienced in July and August. Pruning promotes new growth, and this can be burned by frosts.  Remove all dead leaves and old mulch and spray with Lime Sulphur or Copper Oxychloride on the bushes and all around them. Install and repair any watering systems as this is the best time to get easy access.

Plant seedlings or potted colour of Calendula, Cornflower, Stocks, Snapdragons, Pansies and Violas. Divide Perennials.

Vegetable Garden. Plant Cauliflower, Broccoli, Kale and Cabbage. The White Butterfly season should be over by now but keep an eye out for snails and slugs. Plant peas, Broad Beans, Lettuce, Shallots, Onions and Spring Onions. Divide and plant Rhubarb Crowns.

Home Orchard. Select and plant new bare-root trees including Plums, Apricots, Apples, Nectarines, Peaches and Pears, all of which do well in this area. Commence pruning all the above. Clear away all dead leaves and the remains of fruit, and spray with Lime Sulphur.

Lawns.  The autumn rain will have encouraged weeds to grow. Spray with a recommended weedicide. De-thatch thick lawns followed by mowing, aerating, and applying a good fertiliser.

A handy hint as given by one of our members:  Sprinkle carrot seeds in an area of your vegie garden as you would lawn seed.

 

Photos;  If you have any garden related photos you’d like to share on our Website please forward them to Ralph at rslau@dcsi.net.au

 

Next meeting:  Mon., 24th August commencing at 9.30am.  Doors open 9am for setting up.  PLANT SALE

Flower of the month: 3 spring bulbs.  Morning tea will not be available due to current Covid19 restrictions.

 

September meeting:  Flower of the month: Magnolia, Lilac or Rhododendron. Guest Speaker: John Rowe on Dahlias.  In the following months we will have Prue Metcalf (Life as a Landscape Gardener) and Rolf Willig (cacti & succulents).

 

Please support our Club sponsors: 

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.  rowes@dcsi.net.au  They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. (On the Melbourne side of Drouin) Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

 

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul.  5623 1960

 

 

 

Proposed  Committee Members for Warragul & District Garden Club

Club year 2020-21

 

President                                Joy Vikas

 

Senior Vice President              Ralph Slaughter

 

Vice President                        Henry Cotton

 

Treasurer                               Rob Coustley

 

Assistant Treasurer                Gaylene Slaughter

 

Secretary                              Judy Butler

 

Assistant Secretary               ………………….

 

Newsletter                            Irene Rolfe

 

Publicity Officer                    Annette Willmott

 

Website Managers                  Peter Willmott & Ralph Slaughter

 

Show bench stewards             Marj Blair & Jan Swan

 

Door stewards                        Mary Anglin & Ruth Waring

 

Morning tea roster                 Aileen White & Robyn Hill

 

Projectionist/sound               Heather Coustley

 

Trips organiser                      Joy Vikas

 

Speaker organiser                 Joy Vikas

 

Please note:  We have no nominations for Assistant Secretary.  We invite members to consider volunteering for this position.  If there are any other nominations or objections, please contact Judy Butler prior to 30th June.

 

 

Joy’s Bio

 

I was born into a family who loved gardening and cooking and I cannot remember a time when my love of gardens, and cooking, began. It just did!

 

I am a retired teacher, finishing my career as a School Principal in the town of Singleton, Hunter Valley NSW. My husband, also a teacher, and I were transferred to Singleton in 1973. I was originally appointed to a small school 25 kilometres from Singleton, a rural and mining area also known as the Heart of the Hunter.  

 

Just down the road from the school, on the Putty Road we decided to purchase a bush block, 30 acres of dry land with only a few trees and a new brick house that the vendor was unable to complete. For 35 years we spent long and many hot days completing the house, establishing a vineyard, olive grove and orchard, as well as maintaining a large vegetable garden and an even larger flower garden consisting of roses, natives and anything that could survive extreme temperatures, drought and black frosts. Needless to say it was hard work but when we moved we left behind a beautiful small farm and a sense of great achievement.

 

During our time on the farm I became very interested in organic gardening, growing and cooking healthy food from our small hobby farm for our family. Later I attended TAFE at night for two years and studied a horticultural course that added to this interest. Our teacher, whose primary interest was in herbalism, taught us a lot about gardening, the good and the bad weeds and how to grow and cook weeds as well as the common, and the not so common, vegetables. Needless to say it was a very different course to the usual Cert 1 & 2 Horticulture!

Have you ever tried comfrey fritters or stinging nettle tea? Delicious and nutritious!

 

After retirement, and both our children moving to Victoria, we decided that all the work, as well as the terrible climate, was getting to be a bit of a strain and we questioned, what was the purpose of all the hard work and the constant battle with heat, drought and rain at harvest time? And so we moved and we have never regretted it, actually we often comment it was the best thing we have ever done. We love living in Warragul.

 

I joined the garden club to learn how to garden in an area where it rained and you can experience the four seasons, so different from where I lived before. I also wanted to meet people who had similar likes to myself. From the minute I joined Warragul and District Garden Club I felt welcomed. The many trips we have, the speakers and the incredible exhibits amaze me every time and having the opportunity to ask for answers to my many questions, over a cup of tea and a yummy biscuit.

 

If elected as your new President I will always be available to listen to our member’s suggestions for improvement or ideas as to how you would like your club to continue into the future. With the current COVID 19 situation we need to be flexible, innovative and understanding of the safety and needs of our members.  My vision and aim is to continue with the good work of others who have led our club in the past and to give you, as members, a place where you can gain information, extend you knowledge and enjoy friendship and fellowship through our common love of gardening.