June 2020

Winners of the show bench sections in February as judged by June Dineen.

 

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month

Carol Burns

Heather Coustley

Jan Swan

One Rose  

Aileen White

Diane Hall

Hillary Height

One stem of other flower (not a Rose)

Heather Coustley

Robyn Hill

= Kerry Elliott

= Ralph Slaughter

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Robyn Hill

Aileen White

Heather Coustley

Floral Art (in water)

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Hillary Height

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms, Rhizomes

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

Carol Burns

Heather Coustley

Robyn Hill

Container of flowers

Heather Coustley

= Carol Burns

= Diane Dalton

Diane Dalton

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

Aileen White

Above ground vegetable

Carol Burns

Zelma Cleeland

Ralph Slaughter

Below ground vegetable

Carol Burns

Ralph Slaughter

Carol Burns

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

Aileen White

Aileen White

Kerry Elliott

Fruits, Nuts

Ron Mace

Ralph Slaughter

Aileen White

Novice

A Berkley

 

BEST EXHIBIT

Carol Burns

 

The above results are for the last meeting we had prior to our Covid19 shutdown.

 

We had advice from the Royal Horticultural Society of Victoria, that we suspend meetings until further notice. Now that restrictions have eased, we plan on having our first meeting back on August 24th, with social distancing measures in place.  This meeting (depending on the latest Covid19 rules) will be feature a plant stall.  Could we ask members to please pot up a few plants now in readiness.

 

March is usually our AGM with election of office bearers.  At a Committee meeting held on 1st June a list of possible nominations for the new Committee was made and if any other club members wish to nominate or object please notify Judy by 30th June.  See separate sheet for the proposed nominations.

 

Subscriptions for the upcoming year were discussed and it was suggested they remain the same. $15 per person which covers membership and insurance. This is payable at the August meeting. Please place correct money in an envelope with your name AND address on and give to the Treasurer.

 

Places to go and things to do:

  • Why not take a drive (or walk) to some public parks and gardens?  Have a walk around, admire the gardens, get garden ideas and breathe in the fresh air (while avoiding close contact with others). 
  • On cold, wet days read some of your gardening books and magazines that you have sitting on your bookshelf or coffee table and get inspiration for new things to do in your garden.
  • Tidy the garden shed, clean up garden tools, sharpen garden stakes, take stock of what plant foods, fertilisers, pest control products etc that you have.
  • Thurs. 29th Oct Visit to Country Farm Perennials, Nayook (am) and Jan’s Jindivick garden (pm) in main street, (plenty of parking) (entry $8pp), Travel by private cars.
  • Thurs 12th Nov – Rose gardens – Picardy ($15pp entry) & Crossover Rose garden ($8pp entry). Travel by private cars.

 

Things to do in the garden in June:  June is the official start of Winter and frosts can be expected. When they occur protect frost sensitive plants. Purchase a roll of frost protectant fabric and cover with that. It is claimed that the material increases the temperature on the plant by as much as 3 degrees. Dig rotted compost into the garden. Then apply a good dressing of lime (but not for Camellias, Azaleas, Rhododendrons and Daphne).

Flower garden. Begin Rose pruning around the middle of the month but if necessary, in frost prone areas, delay for a few weeks as severe frosts can be experienced in July and August. Pruning promotes new growth, and this can be burned by frosts.  Remove all dead leaves and old mulch and spray with Lime Sulphur or Copper Oxychloride on the bushes and all around them. Install and repair any watering systems as this is the best time to get easy access.

Plant seedlings or potted colour of Calendula, Cornflower, Stocks, Snapdragons, Pansies and Violas. Divide Perennials.

Vegetable Garden. Plant Cauliflower, Broccoli, Kale and Cabbage. The White Butterfly season should be over by now but keep an eye out for snails and slugs. Plant peas, Broad Beans, Lettuce, Shallots, Onions and Spring Onions. Divide and plant Rhubarb Crowns.

Home Orchard. Select and plant new bare-root trees including Plums, Apricots, Apples, Nectarines, Peaches and Pears, all of which do well in this area. Commence pruning all the above. Clear away all dead leaves and the remains of fruit, and spray with Lime Sulphur.

Lawns.  The autumn rain will have encouraged weeds to grow. Spray with a recommended weedicide. De-thatch thick lawns followed by mowing, aerating, and applying a good fertiliser.

A handy hint as given by one of our members:  Sprinkle carrot seeds in an area of your vegie garden as you would lawn seed.

 

Photos;  If you have any garden related photos you’d like to share on our Website please forward them to Ralph at rslau@dcsi.net.au

 

Next meeting:  Mon., 24th August commencing at 9.30am.  Doors open 9am for setting up.  PLANT SALE

Flower of the month: 3 spring bulbs.  Morning tea will not be available due to current Covid19 restrictions.

 

September meeting:  Flower of the month: Magnolia, Lilac or Rhododendron. Guest Speaker: John Rowe on Dahlias.  In the following months we will have Prue Metcalf (Life as a Landscape Gardener) and Rolf Willig (cacti & succulents).

 

Please support our Club sponsors: 

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.  rowes@dcsi.net.au  They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. (On the Melbourne side of Drouin) Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

 

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul.  5623 1960

 

 

 

Proposed  Committee Members for Warragul & District Garden Club

Club year 2020-21

 

President                                Joy Vikas

 

Senior Vice President           Ralph Slaughter

 

Vice President                       Henry Cotton

 

Treasurer                                Rob Coustley

 

Assistant Treasurer               Gaylene Slaughter

 

Secretary                                Judy Butler

 

Assistant Secretary               ………………….

 

Newsletter                              Irene Rolfe

 

Publicity Officer                             Annette Willmott

 

Website Manager                  Peter Willmott & Ralph Slaughter

 

Show bench stewards           Marj Blair & Jan Swan

 

Door stewards                        Mary Anglin & Ruth Waring

 

Morning tea roster                Aileen White & Robyn Hill

 

Projectionist/sound               Heather Coustley

 

Trips organiser                      Joy Vikas

 

Speaker organiser                  Joy Vikas

 

Please note:  We have no nominations for Assistant Secretary.  We invite members to consider volunteering for this position.  If there are any other nominations or objections, please contact Judy Butler prior to 30th June.

 

 

Joy’s Bio

 

I was born into a family who loved gardening and cooking and I cannot remember a time when my love of gardens, and cooking, began. It just did!

 

I am a retired teacher, finishing my career as a School Principal in the town of Singleton, Hunter Valley NSW. My husband, also a teacher, and I were transferred to Singleton in 1973. I was originally appointed to a small school 25 kilometres from Singleton, a rural and mining area also known as the Heart of the Hunter.  

 

Just down the road from the school, on the Putty Road we decided to purchase a bush block, 30 acres of dry land with only a few trees and a new brick house that the vendor was unable to complete. For 35 years we spent long and many hot days completing the house, establishing a vineyard, olive grove and orchard, as well as maintaining a large vegetable garden and an even larger flower garden consisting of roses, natives and anything that could survive extreme temperatures, drought and black frosts. Needless to say it was hard work but when we moved we left behind a beautiful small farm and a sense of great achievement.

 

During our time on the farm I became very interested in organic gardening, growing and cooking healthy food from our small hobby farm for our family. Later I attended TAFE at night for two years and studied a horticultural course that added to this interest. Our teacher, whose primary interest was in herbalism, taught us a lot about gardening, the good and the bad weeds and how to grow and cook weeds as well as the common, and the not so common, vegetables. Needless to say it was a very different course to the usual Cert 1 & 2 Horticulture!

Have you ever tried comfrey fritters or stinging nettle tea? Delicious and nutritious!

 

After retirement, and both our children moving to Victoria, we decided that all the work, as well as the terrible climate, was getting to be a bit of a strain and we questioned, what was the purpose of all the hard work and the constant battle with heat, drought and rain at harvest time? And so we moved and we have never regretted it, actually we often comment it was the best thing we have ever done. We love living in Warragul.

 

I joined the garden club to learn how to garden in an area where it rained and you can experience the four seasons, so different from where I lived before. I also wanted to meet people who had similar likes to myself. From the minute I joined Warragul and District Garden Club I felt welcomed. The many trips we have, the speakers and the incredible exhibits amaze me every time and having the opportunity to ask for answers to my many questions, over a cup of tea and a yummy biscuit.

 

If elected as your new President I will always be available to listen to our member’s suggestions for improvement or ideas as to how you would like your club to continue into the future. With the current COVID 19 situation we need to be flexible, innovative and understanding of the safety and needs of our members.  My vision and aim is to continue with the good work of others who have led our club in the past and to give you, as members, a place where you can gain information, extend you knowledge and enjoy friendship and fellowship through our common love of gardening. 

 

February 2020

Winners of the show bench sections in January as judged by Dawn Gough.

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month

Jan Swan

Hilary Height

Diane Dalton

One Rose  

Heather Coustley

Annette Willmott

Ralph Slaughter

One stem of other flower (not a Rose)

Aileen White

Aileen White

Aileen White

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

Robyn Hill

Floral Art (in water)

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Annette Willmott

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms, Rhizomes

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

Robyn Hill

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

Aileen White

Aileen White

Heather Coustley

Container of flowers

D. Hall

= Aileen White

= Heather Coustley

=Diane Dalton

= Hilary Height

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

=Aileen White

=Aileen White

Above ground vegetable

Ralph Slaughter

Carol Burns

Carol Burns

Below ground vegetable

Ralph Slaughter

Carol Burns

Carol Burns

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

Carol Burns

Fruits, Nuts

Carol Burns

Aileen White

Diane Dalton

Novice

A Berkery

 

BEST EXHIBIT

D. Hall

 

Today’s guest speaker: Catriona Ferguson “Water saving tips for the garden”.

 

Places to go and things to see:

  • Dahlia Society of Victoria 2020 State Dahlia Show – Diamond Anniversary.  Sat 29th Feb 12.30-5pm & Sun 1 Mar 10-3.30pm.  Mt Waverley Comm. Centre, Miller Cres. Phone 0419 221 200
  • Werribee Park Heritage Orchard Summer Heritage fruit tree Festival. Sun 1st Mar 10am-3pm.  Displays, sales, purchase pre-grafted trees or graft your own. $15 - $25. Stone fruits, apples etc.  Market stalls, food stalls, music, kids’ activities.  Free entry. Gold coin donation for parking. Phone Craig Castree 0411 720 283 for further information.
  • Ferny Creek Horticultural Society 2020 Plant Collectors Sale & Garden Expo. Sat 7th & Sun 8th Mar. 10am – 4pm.  Rare plant sales, garden tools, Botanic artist, wood turning, book sales, guided garden walks, refreshments, light lunches, sausage sizzle.  Free parking. Horticultural Soc. Hall, 100 Hilton Road, Sassafras.
  • Cranbourne Friends of Royal Botanic Gardens Autumn Sale.  Sat 14th & Sun 15th Mar 10am-4pm. Free entry.  Large variety of plants for sale. Plant sale at north end of gardens near the kiosk.
  • Herb & Chilli Festival 2020.  Supporting CFA. Sat 14th & Sun 15th March. Tastings, chilli eating competition, cuisines from all over the world, kids’ entertainment, sales, exhibits, 80+ food stalls (most food dishes under $10), drinks, (bar prices) handcrafts and cook-off. Learn how to grow, store and cook each variety.  Buy tickets online to receive a free hat. Tickets at gate: every ticket purchaser receives a free plant, free online herb/chilli growing course, Festival book & program. 125 Quayle Road, Wandin.  Website: www.herbchillifestival.com.au
  • 25th Anniversary Melbourne International Flower & RHSV Garden Show & Hanging Basket Competition. Wed 25th Mar – Sun 29th March. Royal Exhibition Buildings, Carlton Gardens.
  • Tesselaar Kabloom – Festival of Flowers.  Sat 28th Mar – Sun 19 April. 10am -5pm.  Food, Market stalls, displays, circus acts, wildflower meadows.  Tickets $26.50, Concession $23.50.  357 Monbulk Road, Silvan.

 

Upcoming trip:

A proposed trip to the Melbourne International Flower & Garden Show in Melbourne is planned for Thursday, 26th March.

 

Things to do in the garden in March

The soil will remain warm enough right through until the end of April, so as soon as the Autumn rain arrives take the opportunity to sow relevant seeds. Unfortunately, this is also the time that weed seeds germinate in abundance so be ready to deal with that challenge. Hoeing soon after the little seedlings emerge will save hours later on.

 

Flower Garden: Sow seeds of Carnation, Aquilegia, Alyssum, Cineraria, Delphinium, Dianthus, Polyanthus, Primula, Snapdragon, Viola and Wallflower. Alternatively purchase seedlings of the above and establish early. Planted by the beginning of April, Violas will last right through until December. Once the ground has been well wetted, select new plants to replace those lost during summer heat. Autumn is the best time of the year to plant trees and shrubs from pots as they will establish a new root system before next summer. Bare rooted planting should not begin until mid-May.

 

Vegetable Garden: Plant seeds of Beetroot, Cabbage, Turnip, Radish, Cauliflower, Broccoli, Silverbeet, Spinach and Spring Onion. Again, many of the above can be purchased as seedlings if required. Watch for signs of caterpillar damage on cabbages etc and take action.

 

Lawns: Now is the best to establish new lawns either by seed or turf. New roots will be able to go deep down before the hot days of next summer. The use of specially formulated fertiliser at the time of sowing seed will pay dividends and will not burn the new roots. Provide fertiliser for established lawns and re-sow those dead or damaged areas.

 

Orchard: Look for signs of Black Mould that usually indicates the presence of Scale. Ants running up the trunk of trees can be another sign. Spray with White Oil twice at an interval of a month. For heavy infestations it may be necessary to use an initial spraying of a Scale preparation that incorporates an insecticide. Citrus trees should receive a dressing of Fruit Tree Fertiliser during March to swell the fruit and increase sweetness.

 

I tried to catch some fog:  I mist….

 

Next meeting:  This is our AGM when the election of office bearers for the following year takes place.  Monday, 23rd March 2020 commencing at 9.45am.  Doors open 9am for setting up.  Entries for show bench to be placed for judging prior to 9.30am.

Morning tea hosts:  To be advised

Guest speaker March:  Helen Lovell from Neutrog.

Flower of the month (March): One Rose

 

Please support our Club sponsors: 

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.  rowes@dcsi.net.au  They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. (On the Melbourne side of Drouin) Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

 

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul.  5623 1960

 

January 2020

                  January 2020

Winners of the show bench sections in November as judged by June Dineen.

Section

First

Second

Third

Flower of the month (Rose)

Robyn Hill

Ralph Slaughter

Heather Coustley

One Rose  

See flower of month

 

 

One stem of other flower (not a Rose)

Aileen White

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

Stem of foliage (no buds or flowers)

Aileen White

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

Floral Art (in water)

Heather Coustley

Heather Coustley

Annette Willmott

Bulbs, Tubers, Corms, Rhizomes

Diane Dalton

Heather Coustley

Diane Dalton

Flowering Shrub (in flower) 1 stem

Heather Coustley

Aileen White

Aileen White

Container of flowers

Ralph Slaughter

Aileen White

Diane Dalton

Cacti, succulent or potted plant

Robyn Hill

B & A Mentiplay

Aileen White

Above ground vegetable

Carol Burns

Heather Coustley

Ralph Slaughter

Below ground vegetable

Carol Burns

 

 

Herbs (flowering, non-flowering, mixed)

Heather Coustley

Carol Burns

Aileen White

Fruits, Nuts

Robyn Hill

Aileen White

Ralph Slaughter

Novice

Cheryl Birchill

 

BEST EXHIBIT

Carol Burns

 

Guest speaker today:  Photos from the group who went to the Hunter Valley Gardens.

 

Places to go and things to do:

  • Melbourne Begonia Society – Show and sales 2020.  Saturday Feb 22nd 10am-4pm & Sunday Feb 23rd 10am-3pm. Adults $5, Concession $3, Children free.  BYO bags. Moorabbin Senior Citizens Hall, 964 Nepean Highway, Moorabbin. Janeen 0404 817 419, Marilyn 03 9758 6642.
  • Werribbee Park Heritage Orchard – Summer heritage fruit tree festival. Sunday 1st March 10am-3pm.  Purchase grafted trees at bargain prices $15 - $25.  Peaches, Nectarines, Apricots, Plums, Apples & Cherries etc.  Farm tours, grafting demonstrations, market stalls, live folk music, food stalls, kids activities.  Free entry. Gold coin donation for parking.  Craig Castree 0411 720 283.
  • Ferny Creek Horticultural Society 2020. Plant Collectors Sale & Garden Expo. Saturday 7th March, Sunday 8th March 10am-4pm.  Rare plant sales, garden tools, Botanical artist, wood turning, book sales, guided garden walks, refreshments, light lunches, sausage sizzle.  Free onsite parking.  Ferny Creek Horticultural Society Hall, 100 Hilton Road, Sassafrass.

 

Gladioli:  Gladiolus - from the Latin ‘gladius’ are part of the lily family and means Sword Lily.  In the days of the Roman gladiators, soldiers would wear them around their necks for protection when fighting in battle.

Gladiolis originated in Africa and Asia and were introduced to Europe and North America during the 1700’s when trade routes were expanded.  The seeds when crushed have been used medicinally for drawing out splinters.

There are over 250 species in a wide variety of colours.  Gladioli are the birth flower for August and symbolise strength and moral integrity. They also represent infatuation and therefore are known as the 40th wedding anniversary flower.  A more sinister side is that they are poisonous to cats, dogs and horses.  Some people are sensitive to the sap produced so for them, wearing gloves is recommended.

The ideal time to cut a flower stem is early in the morning when it is cooler and when the plant is hydrated.  Cut the stem when one or two flowers are opened (at the bottom) and the rest will open in due course, making a long-lasting display.

 

Things to do in the garden in February

 

Flower Garden

Plant seeds of Winter flowering annuals such as Pansy, Violas, Phlox, Alyssum, Primula etc so that they become established while the soil is still warm. Complete the division of Irises and tidy up plants, removing dead leaves. Do not put mulch around Irises and spray leaves with Liquid Copper if they show signs of fungus die-back. Buy spring bulbs as they appear in the stores & catalogues.

Cut back roses 55-65 days before Easter, providing another dose of fertiliser and a good watering so that they look great at Easter. Keep up the spraying for Aphids, Black Spot, and Downy Mildew.

 

Vegetable Garden

Plant seeds of Winter vegetables such as Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Chinese Cabbage, Leeks and Lettuce. Spring onions, Parsnips, Beetroot and Shallots can also be planted. Trim lower leaves from Tomatoes to allow quicker ripening and pinch out the tops of the plants before they get too high

 

Home Orchard

Net trees to protect fruit from birds. Carry out summer pruning of stone fruit. Watch for infestations of ‘Pear Slug’ and treat with a pyrethroid such as Maverick. Remove any weeds around Citrus trees. Cut out old raspberry canes and tie up new ones that will provide next year’s fruit.

 

Lawns

Keep the mower blades high during the hot days of Summer. Provide water where necessary and a dressing of lawn fertiliser to keep the grass green and growing.

 

Try to remember: the greener grass across the fence may be due to a septic tank issue.

 

A Rosemary by another name:

With the confusion of plants being called different names by different people, a scientific plant naming system began in 1753.  Rosemary and Salvias, although having similar stamens were considered two entirely separate genera.  After recent research by the Royal Horticultural Society, Rosemary has been reclassified as a Salvia.  Its new scientific name will be Salvia Rosmarinus.  Its common name remains Rosemary. (Rosemary is closely related to Salvia officinalis or Culinary Sage).

 

Did you know that food can only be tasted if mixed with saliva?

 

Next meeting:  Monday, 24th February 2020 commencing at 9.45am.  Doors open 9am for setting up.  Entries for show bench to be placed for judging prior to 9.30am.

Morning tea hosts:  To be advised

Guest speaker February:  To be advised

Flower of the month (February): Container of Dahlias

 

Please support our Club sponsors: 

  • Rowes nursery, ture of peet moss and top soil. The potatoes keep the stems moist and help develop the root systems. It's a perfectly simple way to multiply your rose garden without spending lots of $$$.Landsborough Road, Warragul.  rowes@dcsi.net.au  They have a large range of plants for sale, a wealth of garden knowledge and ask about receiving their regular email newsletters.
  • Drouin Home Hardware, Princes Way, Drouin. (On the Melbourne side of Drouin) Check their hardware, gardening products and plants.
  • Kurinda Roses, Warragul-Lardner Road, Warragul.  Select from their huge range of roses at reasonable prices.  They also have a lovely range of garden related gifts for sale in their shop.
  • Mattz Mowing and Garden Services. Lawn mowing, garden edges, hedge trimming, weed control, pruning, gutters cleaned etc.  Free quotes. Phone Matthew 0439 312 465

 

Printing of this newsletter courtesy Gary Blackwood MLA and staff, 3/24 Mason Street, Warragul.  5623 1960